MLB Bat Rules

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Does MLB allow glued up blanks for bats?
Secondary question: Can the individual laminations be of different woods?
Tertiary Question: If glue-ups are not allowed, what woods are allowed?
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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I think sometimes they use cork for inner laminations!
--
Stoutman
http://www.garagewoodworks.com
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No.
"1.10 (a) The bat shall be a smooth, round stick not more than 2 3/4 inches in diameter at the thickest part and not more than 42 inches in length. The bat shall be one piece of solid wood."
www.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/mlb/official_info/official_rules/objectives_1.jsp

n/a
Anything you want. Rule 1.10 (d) prohibits the use of colored bats without prior approval, and I imagine that an umpire would look a bit askance at a bat made of, say, purpleheart, under that rule. But a strict reading of the rules would permit it.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Maybe.
You edited, Doug...
1.10 (a) The bat shall be a smooth, round stick not more than 2 3/4 inches in diameter at the thickest part and not more than 42 inches in length. The bat shall be one piece of solid wood. *NOTE: No laminated or experimental bats shall be used in a professional game (either championship season or exhibition games) until the manufacturer has secured approval from the Rules Committee of his design and methods of manufacture.*
(emphasis mine)
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dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca wrote:

Well, yes, but until the Rules Committee has actually approved one...
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Thanks, Doug.
I want to make a bat as a present for a friend of mine who plays in a Senior league that abides by MLB rules.
You kept me from being a little more creative than the rules apparently allow for.
I'm not a fast enough lathe guy to waste time on the road not to be taken.
Thanks again.
On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 00:50:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Tom,
"...not a fast enough lathe guy..." caught my attention. You already have the "word" on your original query: One piece.
It doesn't take that long. I hadn't used my lathe in maybe 20-25 years when I happened to catch a New Yankee Workshop episode on lathe basics. My grandson -- then almost 8 -- asked if I had such a tool (he loves to watch with me, along with his little sister!). I did, and we went out to the shop to look it over.
Norm Abram ended the show by turning a bat, then going out to Fenway Park where a big leaguer used it in batting practice and knocked one or two over the Green Monster.
So...I go to the hardwood dealer, buy a bat billet, and turn a bat for my grandson. 29" length in exactly the same proportions as one of his aluminum bats. BIG mistake. First batting practice he cracked it! (I'm VERY proud of the guy!) The long, thin handle of an aluminum bat is too long, too thin, and creates a weak spot about where the diameter starts to grow to the barrel.
So...another trip to the hardwood dealer, another billet, and now I pay attention to the shape of other wooden bats. It's heavier than the original, even though I made it only 28" long.
Moral of the story, for the bat for your friend, is find out how long (and how heavy) he wants his bat, then find one that meets his needs and copy it.
By the way, a gouge is a lot easier for me to use than a skew, so almost everything was done with a 3/4" gouge and a parting tool. I used a skew mostly for "smoothing" (along with sandpaper and a rasp).
Jim Stuyck
wrote:

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Ash
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"Tom Watson" asks:
>>If glue-ups are not allowed, what woods are >>allowed?
Leon answered: > Ash
Is Hickory allowed and/or used?
Lew
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I have seen maple used by some turners.
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On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 23:12:38 -0400, "Lee Michaels"

I saw an interview a while back where a player was saying sometimes depending on the weather they use a different wood. I can't remember whether it was related to how often they'd break or how the ball travelled off it.
-Leuf
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Actually, the rules don't say anything about the type of wood. Ash is most common, but it's certainly not the only thing permitted. IIRC, Babe Ruth used bats made of rock maple.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Bonds and serverla other elite players have been using hard maple bats, custom made in Canada. Hickory is also used. Ash is the most common still.
-Zz
On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 02:55:13 GMT, "Leon"

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Rules of baseball says it has to be one solid piece of wood.
It makes no mention of the type of wood allowed -- so any, one supposes.
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You have to think that a bat made from purpleheart or zebrano or karelian birch would look magnificent, but probably not be strong enough for anything but bunting. I note no mention of min/max weight - and I'm sure there must be. So although theoretically any wood could be used for a bat, some (like lignum vitae?) would probably be automatically excluded because of their heaviness.
FoggyTown
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Purpleheart, at least, would surely be strong enough for a full swing at a Randy Johnson fastball. For bunting, one would want a bat that's nearly as "dead" as possible; cottonwood, basswood, and balsa spring to mind.

Actually, there is neither a minimum nor maximum weight, only maximum diameter and maximum length.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Maybe elm as it is lighter than most hardwoods but not prone to splitting.
I've read that cricket bats are made from willow.
I'd like to see a bat made from persimmon.
--

FF


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Golf Ball Bat. ;~) Golf club "Woods" are often made from persimmon.
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wrote:

No
Only two in use in the MLB are Ash and Maple, whether others would be allowed I do not know.
(sixoneeight) = 618
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Read the rules. There is provision for laminated bats to be approved.
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