Milwaukee 5616-20 2-1/4 Max HP EVS

I hate it when people write, "what do you think of the XXX", when if they had just done a Google they would know.
Well, I did, and came up with nothing. I want to buy a router to leave in my router table. The Milwaukee looks like it should be really easy to adjust, and at $170 for a 13a variable speed, it seems like a hell of a buy.
So, what is wrong with it? If it was as good as it seems, it would be way more popular.
I guess my other choice is the Porter Cable 690LRVS, but it is less powerful (?), more difficult to adjust (?), and only $25 less.
Comments? (other than "stop writing dumb posts")
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Usually a router hung under a table is sooner or later subject to bigger tasks such as raised panels. Most raised panels are cut with large diameter bits that ideally require a larger router than either that you have mentioned. If it were me looking to for a router for this type application, I would look a step up from either of those models something in the 15 amp range. I kinda like the look of the bigger Milwaukee myself.
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recently upgraded from a Skil 5a to a Craftsman 6.5a I bought at a garage sale for $4; so 13a, or even 10a, will be huge.
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I have the Milwaukee 5625-20 in my table and love it. You're right about the ease of adjustability! A router lift really wouldn't improve this setup. You can raise/lower from above the table, and dial in 1/64th increments trivially from below.
The only thing I'd say about the 5616 is that it might be underpowered for a table. If you ever want to do 3.5" raised hardwood panels, for example, you're going to want more juice. I was actually considering the 5616 as a second router for handheld use...
FWIW.
Brian.

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How does it work? Do you have to unclamp something before turning the adjustment, or is it stable enough to hold it's setting without a lock? Can you set the height from below (with that knob sticking out on top presumably) easily also? I presume you have to drill a hole in the table for the adjustment tool, and am not sure I want to do that right away.
I just ruined a 6' piece of walnut because the adjustment "lock" on my crappy router vibrated open during a cut and threw everything off; so I want to be sure on the new one!
Thanks.

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Yes, there is a clamp that locks it down securely. I can reach below and find it without looking, but have never tried routing with it unlocked and have no desire to try it. The height can be set from below with the knob, and I drilled a hole in my router plate so I can adjust from above also. To be honest, though, I'm not so sure its anymore convenient from above than from below. But I do like to adjust from above for the initial test cut setting, though, because I can eyeball the bit height from above while raising/lowering it.
The ease of adjustment as compared to the Porter Cable 7518 (the other legit contender for a table router IMO) is night and day, though. The clamping mechanism is easier/quicker. The non-helical base is much nicer (no cord twisting/tangling). And small incremental adjustments are more precise. I am taking an "Advanced" shop class at a local Jr. college, and they have the Porter Cables on two tables. I always wish I had my Milwaukee there everytime I go to use the tables at school. :-)
Brian.
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Brian wrote:

ahemm. What about the Triton? What makes it non-legit?
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Hi Wade, I have a Triton TRA001 that I use in both my horizontal and vertical home made router tables. In the fertile table I use this in conjunction with an Incra Ultra 16" fence. Mounting is easy with the two 1/4 " bolts that can be placed through the holes in the base plate then through the table. It is designed for above the table bit changes, has an optional rack winder or plunge height adjustment (removable plunge spring) as well as micro winder for precise depth adjustment. Variable speed 8,000 - 20,000 rpm, soft start. Height lock and shaft lock with power on light and safety cover over start switch, as well as over ride when shaft is locked. Power is 2400 watts or 3.2 HP, it does all I chores with out a whimper. see at www.triton.net.au Have a look and tell me what you think.
Lew

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It looks like a great router. Sadly, it is about twice my budget.

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Brian wrote:

As an alternative...there are vertical panel-raising bits that do not require as much HP. As a bonus, with at least a few mfrs the vertical bits cost less, too. They seem much safer.

I've been considering the smaller one (5615?) for handheld use - mostly round-overs, bevels, and other edge treatments. I really like the BodyGrip concept - just feels more natural to me.
Ideally, I'd like a laminate trimmer-sized tool...but they are all limited to 1/4" shank bits and I don't want to start re-buying the bits I have. The 5615 seems like the closest thing for me.
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Those are OK, until you need to do a raised panel that does not have straight lines. Those type bits do not do curves.
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Leon wrote:

They would do the same job as a horizontal bit...in a horizontal router table.
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Nope. You can only successfully do straight cuts with a vertical raised panel bit. Concave and convex cuts are out.

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