Man, I am sick what shoudl I do?

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I don't know where you live, but here (Edmonton, AB, Canada, population about 1,000,000), I can look in the phone book and find a good dozen places that sell tools and accessories, and most of their stuff would be less than Sears. More knowledgeable staff, too. Even in the town I lived in before (population < 100,000), there was at least 4 tool places that I could wander in and around on a Saturday morning.
Your questions about whether Grizzly has fast shipping could be best answered by going to the Grizzly website (which someone gave to you) and/or phoning their 1-800 number.
Clint
wrote:

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Have you looked at Harbor Freight??? Maybe you should.
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http://www.google.com
You can *easily* find many sources of dial indicators for a lot less than that.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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But at some point, you're going to want to set the blades on a new jointer anyway. So it's not like that money's wasted. You can also use the dial indicator and base for setting up other tools, like saws, as well as measuring run-out on things that spin around (routers, drill presses, etc), preferably with the power off.
One of your first issues is going to Sears to buy tools and tool accessories. For example, go to www.amazon.com, and type in "dial indicator" as a search item. It will come up with a ton of options, starting at $20 for both the indicator and magnetic base. I think the Starrett was $150, though, so save your pennies. :)
Here's my other thought. I wouldn't pay anything for a new tool with the "Craftsman" name on it. I know, it seems like they've got some decent tablesaws now, and they've probably got some other gems in their pile of stuff. And yes, it seems like some of the previously "good" brands turn out more lemons now than they used to. But that's my personal opinion.
Having said that, the $50 you spent on the second-hand Craftsman didn't seem like a bad investment, although I probably wouldn't have done it. $50 on an old Jet or Delta, yeah, no problem. But not a Craftsman. Difficulty in finding parts and consumables, lack of specific knowledge on the Internet, etc would have dissuaded me. On the plus side, you probably can't lose too much money on the purchase. If you get it up and running, you should be able to re-coup any expenses (original purchase + reasonable parts) if you decide you need to get rid of it later. Same can't be said for the new jointer, I don't think. So I'd stick with the old one for now, plug away on it for awhile, see if you can get it working.
Clint

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Clint wrote:

Ask the cashier to pry the nameplate off for you.
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Depending on how old your machine is, my guess is though it might not be hi-tech or whatever, it's probably better built than a new one and has a lot more steel in it... You might consider your restore as gained knowledge that you'll have if you have a problem with the machine later, as opposed to having to learn to troubleshoot/fix the new one later... Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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I'd say keep the old one.
1) Why new knives? I was surprised at how reasonable they were to sharpen when I ruined mine by running plywood edges through. Seems like they charged $0.50 per inch, or $9 for a set of 6" knives.
2) A link belt is not very expensive. Not sure why you are using a belt the wrong size.
3) Get a guard. How does it mount? Unless it is a unique design for Sears, you should be able to find one that works.
4) Align the tables and you will be good to go, for a lot less money than new.
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Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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I am not sure how the guard mounts. Where can I find a replacement?
Here is a picture of a similar jointer. http://www.owwm.com/PhotoIndex/detail.asp?id 46 WHat do you think?
Problem with blades is mine look like someone has tried to regrind them. I cant tell what the origional angle was supposed to be. Looks like it maybe has two angles?
alexy wrote:

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*snip*

*snip*
There's a cutlery place in our local mall that does knife sharpening. They're about $1 per inch (from what the guy told me) but if you've got a good set of knives it's well worth the price.
Puckdropper
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stryped wrote:

To me, it's not either/or. I'd get the new one, set it up, and run some boards on it. Then I'd refurb the old one and see if I could make it work just as well. Either way, I should end up with at least one good jointer and maybe one to sell, and along the way I'll have learned all about jointers for very low tuition.
If you want to joint today, get the new one. If you want to mess around with a machine and see what happens, keep the old one. If you want both, do both. If you only want to joint, get the new one and sell the old one, or part it out, or turn it into a conceptual lawn sculpture.
One way I learn about any item-- not just tools-- is by trying an ostenbsibly crummy one next to an ostensibly good one. Sometimes the difference is negligible for my purposes. Sometimes it's night and day. Either way, lesson learned.
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stryped wrote:

Facts... 1. You paid $50 for the old one (?) 2. It needs knives (and cutter head?) 3. It needs a guard 4. You indicate that the tables need some work
Supposition... 1. The old one *may* be built like a brick, errrr...house
Rhetorical questions... 1. How good is the new one for $239? (looks OK from photo) 2. Why was the price reduced by 40%? (Supplanted by a newer model, looks like.)
What to do... 1. If you buy the new one and junk the old one, your total cost is $289 and you save a bunch of time messing with the old one. You could also fix the old one and sell it for more than you paid *IF* you get it functional without spending major money.
2. If you decide to fix the old and not buy the new you are faced with unknown costs and time and the possibility of still not having a machine you are happy with.
Given the above, I'd buy the new and spend a bit of time trying to fix the old. If time and/or costs got excessive - or if I ran into unsuspected, major problems - I'd junk it. Given your obsession over joining for lo these many weeks that is what I would suggest for you even though you could use your router and make perfectly lovely straight edges on boards.
--

dadiOH
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stryped (in snipped-for-privacy@i3g2000cwc.googlegroups.com) said:
| I just went on the sears website to see if I could find blades for | this old jointer. I saw on clearance a jointer on clearance for | 239. It was before 399.99. It can be shipped to the store for free. | | I wish I had known about this before I bought this old one. Should I | keep going on trying to get this old one going with new knives, | belt, etc or shoudl I cut my losses? Will I be as happu with this | old jointer as the new one?
Older /might/ be /better/. If you'd waited long enough, you might have found one sitting on someone's curb - though you might've had to wait for a long time. I'd stick with the one you've got unless and until it won't do the job.
Will you be happy? That's pretty much under _your_ control. As one of my favorite songwriters said: "You can be happy if you've a mind to." Deciding to be happy has a lot going for it.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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You will never be happy. Better just take all those woodworking tools to the dump right now. Rumor has it that there are new saws coming out on the market, painted different colors than the previous models. If you don't get out now, you're just going to be a frustrated person.
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-Mike-
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And for heaven's sake, never buy a computer! Or at least get it sent to you express, in which case you might get to use it for up to a week before the next better/cheaper model comes out.
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Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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wrote:

By the time the consumer can purchase a computer, it's already obsolete. However, there's a large gap in systems that can run "modern" software. It's greater than it's ever been.
Puckdropper
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stryped wrote:

You should switch your computer off and go and fix your jointer.
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