Making slots for table

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Building a table, think torsion box-like.
Will consist of several pieces of ply (it's not for furniture, sort of a hobby table), that interlock through slots. Cross pieces will lock with long-wise pieces.
I got to knock out about 20 or 30 of these slots, or thereabouts. I'm thinking building a router template then using a spiral bit with a collar around the template.
Better ideas?
MJ
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"MJ" wrote:

Incomplete details to adequately respond.
Lew
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On 9/17/2010 8:18 PM, MJ wrote:

http://www.bridgecitytools.com/Products/KM-1+Kerfmaker
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Last update: 4/15/2010
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At first my reaction was not another gizmo... but this one looks nice. Very simple to use. Thanks. for the info.
On 9/17/2010 10:27 PM, Swingman wrote:

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Those drawer joints looked a bit *too* tight; if you have to hammer them together, you risk splitting out the dadoes (and you WILL split them out once add in the glue). Best to slack off the fit by the thickness of a rolling paper. For $65, probably a nice tool if you're doing production work. Cheap for Bridge City, actually.
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Slicker'n snot on a boardwalk!
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As cluttered as my shop is, I'd probably loose that small of a tool in a heartbeat. Looks neat, though. Wonder if getting sawdust in its insides, somewhere, might screw up its accuracy?
Sonny
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Nope. Nowhere to get sawdust into. It's an incredibly simple device.
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<...snipped...>

That looks like a nifty tool. To set a groove kerf without a special too, take any piece of scrap with at least one straight edge. Set your rip fence somewhat narrower than the scrap and rip it to any arbitray width. Now take a piece of the stock that you want to match the groove width too, and place it between the fence and the 1st scrap piece. It needs to be long enough to act as fence itselt. Rip the scrap piece again, this time so it is riding against the sample piece being held against the fence. The cutoff produced will be exactly (within the limits of your machine's accurace) the width of the stock less your saw's kerf.
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Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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The router will cut relatively slowly, make lots of noise, and make fine dust.
A biscuit joiner will cut quicker, make lots of noise, make coarse dust.
A mortising chisel (square chisel with central auger-like bit) will cut more quietly, make shavings instead of dust, and is intermediate in speed.
An auger or Forstner bit and chisel and mallet will do it slowest, make big shavings (chips), and is the most fun. For learning about wood, and about sharpening of chisels, everyone should do this at least once. 20 or 30, though, starts to seem excessive.
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MJ wrote:

Depends on how long the slots are to be. If not too long, a table saw would be worlds faster, you could stack the pieces and cut slots in each at one time...position stack, cut, position stack, cut. Et cetera.
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table top) the internal cross members were relatively thin (quarter- inch or so) and the slots were half their width (less than half the thickness of the finished torsion box).
I think a ten-inch TS will cut in excess of 3" at ninety degrees. Less with a DADO blade.
But, as someone pointed out already, the OP provided insufficient detail from which to determine a best practices approach the project at hand.
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Are you sure? Seems I recall having to go to a 12" TS to cut 2.75 inches.
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Jim in NC



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wrote:

Most, even the benchtop saws cut 3-1/8" @90degrees. Surprised me, I expected the benchtops to be less than cabinet saws (Ryobi and Delta benchtops cut 3" @90).
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Morgans wrote:

10" blade = 3 1/2 cut at 90 degrees is usual
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dadiOH wrote:

(whoops) = 3 1/8
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Some of the responses have indicated that I failed to give more detail.
Hopefully, this will help.
I want to build a grid of interlocking pieces of plywood (3/4"). Each long piece in the grid will be 4 feet long, the cross piece is also 4 feet. The height of all the pieces is 4 inches. On top of this, I'll put a sheet of 3/4 ply. I don't need to make the top super flat as in a torsion box just ok will do. The idea is that I'll be able knock this down when I need to, which I expect could happen over time. Want to end up with a grid 4 feet by 4 feet.
I was thinking of a grid of three pieces in length and 5 cross pieces with one at each end.
The interlocking slots need to be all the same depth, width and in the same spot on each corresponding pieces (each cross piece needs to be identical, each long piece the same).
I was thinking of a dado cut, but just not sure if an 8" dado would cut that high, and to be sure of consistently in the slots, I'd would have to gang the pieces together. Seems to be a bit of over engineering.
I was thinking of making a template out of MDF or ply. A router could be used to ride the template and cut out the slots.
Someone suggested to me use of a jigsaw, but I really want super straight cuts and each to be the same. Not sure if the jigsaw is the right tool for this job.
I looked at the Kerfmaker - nice tool, but am barely able to afford to buy MDF these days then another tool. Besides, it looks like it's better for a tablesaw, then a router.
Hope that helps.
MJ
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"MJ" wrote:

Based on your description, this is a classic table saw job.
Do you have a decent T/S?
If so, do you also have a dado set?
Just curious, why do you want the ply pieces to interlock?
What is the ultimate purpose of this structure?
Will await your response.
Lew
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Ok.

Yes
Yes
It's my table, I want it this way. As I explained in my second note, I might have to dismantle it.

Support 1/2" plywood (4x4) with about a 50 lb load - tops.

I await yours.
MJ
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Based on your inputs, here is how I would attack this project.
Start with a 48" x 97" x 12mm (4 ply) sheet of CDX plywood and cross cut a 48" x 48-1/4" piece for the top. with a guide and a circular saw.
Use a router and a straight edge to clean up cut edge for a 48" x 48" top
Cross cut the remaining ply into 24" x 48+" pieces.
Rip 5 pieces, 4" x 48+" from each 24" x 48+" pieces.
Final cross cut 2 pieces, 4" x 48".
Final cross cut 8 pieces, 4" x 47".
Set aside the 48" and 2 of the 47" pieces for the outside box frame.
Temporally screw the remaining 6 pieces into groups of 3 pieces.
Set up your dado to cut 2" high x 12mm wide dado. (Make a new zero clearance insert)
Set up a box joint jig using your miter gage to set the correct spacing between dadoes.
Again set up a zero clearance insert on the box joint jig using some scrap 1/4" material.
All the wooden parts are now complete.
When assembled, you will have a 4 x 4 box with 16, 1 x 1 boxes inside.
You indicate you may want to take box apart, so time for a trip to the hardware store.
Get 2 pcs, 1-1/4" x 1-1/4" x 1/16" x 96" aluminum angle and a throw away table saw blade to cut the aluminum angle.
Also the following hardware:
100 pcs, 1/4"-20 x 1", Flat hd bolts 100 pcs, 1/4"-20 x 1", Hex hd bolts 100 pcs, 1/4"-20 x 1", Hex nuts 100 pcs, 1/4" Flat washers
Using aluminum cutting blade, cut angle into 4" pieces (32 minimum).
Next drill 9/32" holes thru flanges of the angles.
Each corner piece requires 2 holes in each flange.
All interior and cover angles require 2 holes in one flange, 1 hole in the other flange.
That's a lot of bolts and nuts, but it insures a strong box that can be assembled or disassembled as needed.
Depending on final use and the amount of work you have invested, you may want to upgrade the plywood from CDX.
Have fun.
Lew
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