making a mirror

Folks,
Need bit of advice. I am making a custom mirror frame to match a vanity I made earlier in the summer. I have the concept down of building a pitcure frame to hold the glass with a rabbet from the back but I am looking for ways to hold the mirror in the rabbet -- first thought is to use silicone caulk as a glue but I am wondering if I need some sort of mechanical means to hold the mirror in the rabbet (in addition or instead of the glue/caulk). Of course the mirror will be hung from the frame .....
Cheers
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Sam the Cat wrote:

Make a double rebate, one for the mirror and one for a 1/4" plywood backing that can be screwed to the frame.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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You want a glass retainer. Rockler has them and I'm sure others do also.
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If it's a square frame then it is a simple matter of making some backing strips of wood that matches the frame. Use silicone on both sides of the mirror, and then put the wood strips so that they sit flush with the back of the frame. Make them rectangular, with the shorter dimension going vertical onto the mirror. Bevel the outer inside edge and drive pin nails into the frame to secure the strips. I've done this several times when putting glass into projects (cabinets, clocks, etc.) and it really looks better than anything else I've seen. For a mirror, where noone will likely see the back, there might be other ways to do it, although this approach isn't very difficult.
Mike

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You have some good tips already. I'll add that you might paint the rabbet black, or you'll see the unfinished surface and the glass cut in the edge reflection.
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On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 21:14:13 -0400, "Eric Ryder"

Lots of tips, I see after reading the whole thread. Glazing points are the easiest, though- and they are the standard hardware for just about any window.
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On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 20:45:11 -0400, "Sam the Cat"

The standard method is to use glazing points (just ask for them at the hardware store, they should have 'em anywhere) and then use a glazing compound to seal and hold the mirror in place. Easy to do, even for a beginner- the glazing points just press in with a flathead screwdriver or putty knife, and the glazing compund is applied just like caulk.

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Are you sure about what you are saying concerning Mirrors? I just posted pics of a curio cabinet that has a 2 mirrored back. My local glass supplier indicated that most any sealant adhesive or glue that comes in contact with the mirror back can damage the mirror backing. Also if using glazing points you could scratch the back plating on the mirror.
I went with my own 1/4" rounds and brad nailed them in.
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On Sun, 24 Oct 2004 19:48:16 GMT, "Leon"

You could be right, of course. I've done a lot of windows like this, but only 2 or 3 mirrors. In all cases, everything worked out just fine, but I didn't do any mirrors until after I had replaced the glass in about 3 dozen windows, so I may have just had the right touch when it came to putting in the points. Honestly, it's been long enough that I don't even really remember whether I used glazing compund or not with the mirrors, so it's possible the stuff could wreck the back of a mirror (Though I remember it being ok IIRC- it could be that the product I used had a different chemical composition than some others) Obviously, standard advice applies here- test in a hidden area before using anything in the final project!
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wrote:
(Though I remember it being ok IIRC- it could be that the

Just to clarify that a bit more, I was under the impression that the damage to the plating could be over a period of time. Testing may not be long enough unless you let the test go for a year or 2.
Perhaps a piece of mirror with several possible compounds used for a long term test.
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wrote:

it doesn't take that long. acids used for soldering mirror into stained glass items can destroy the edges in just a few days.
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On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 20:45:11 -0400, "Sam the Cat"
I use a backing board, same as for picture framing. Small brads hold the board in place. The backer may be hardboard (masonite), or for better work (especially with big mirrors) it's hardboard with a layer or artist's grey mounting board on the inside.
If you have moisture movement problem in the frame, you can twist and crack a big mirror. A soft mounting board interlayer helps avoid this.
Don't use silicone caulk near mirrors. It releases acid when it cures and that damages the silvering. Use either electronics-grade (low-acid) silicone, or a special mirror-mounting mastic (cheaper).
Rabbet jokes: http://www.frozenreality.co.uk/comic/bunny/index.php?idR
--
Smert' spamionam

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wrote:

spray the edge and the first few inches of the back paint with clear varnish or lacquer to protect the edge.
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I mad my own 1/4 rounds and brad nailed them in. My glass supplier strongly advised against using any type of adhesive or sealant for mounting a mirror. Apparently these compounds will damage the mirror plating if they get on the plating.
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