magnetic nail holder

was watch one of the how-to-show's the other day and saw a round tube nail holder with a red rubber handle, can't remember if it was ask this old house or Ron Hazelton show, but I can't find them anywhere has anyone seen them anywhere? had a small u cut in end with a magnetic in the tube.
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Was it something like this? http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pidG8154

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Sun, Jan 28, 2007, 11:07am (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@sasktel.net (Doug Brown) doth queryeth: Was it something like this? http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid=478154
Hah, that's kinda slick. Be easy enough to make one too. Stick a small magnet in a tube, crimp the tube, or use gule, knotch the end of te tube. Viola, nail holder. Of course, then you'd have one more little gadget invented to solve a non problem to keep track of whenever you want to use it. OR, you could just cut a little slit in the end of a piece of scrap wood, just large enough to hold your nail, for free; and, you won't need to worry about misplacingt it. A piece of tape, looped, with the sticky out, works too. Me, I'd probably just hold the nail with my fingers, and just tap to get it started, not hard enough to hurt if I missed - I can usually find my fingers when I need 'em.
JOAT Bugrit. Millennium hand AND shrimp.
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looped, with the sticky out, works too. Me, I'd probably just hold the nail with my fingers, and just tap to get it started, not hard enough to hurt if I missed - I can usually find my fingers when I need 'em.
It could be a really useful tool for people with slightly unsteady hand motion when swinging the hammer. I taught leathercraft at a local hospital and experienced quite a few hits on the hand with the hammer when working with quadriplegics. Fortunately, most of them didn't have sufficient arm power to build up a really heavy swing of the wooden hammer.
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Looks like a neat idea. Where I have the most trouble is with small brads. (Yes I do sometimes still drive them by hand) I can't hold them between my thumb & finger with enough left above to avoid hitting thumb with hammer. I've often used a needlenose pliers to hold them while starting but this gizmo looks like a better idea. Think I'll make my own rather than purchase, though.
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Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf.lonestar.org
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This sounds like a job for: http://www.bostonindustrial.com/35mataha.html Kerry
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Two things work well for small brads. A Warrington hammer is designed for those situations. Also, a brad pusher works well.

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with elongated slit (flatten the tube slightly for a elongated hole and more suck) inside surgical hose attached to a vacuum device. Much better than a magnet because it will only pick up one nail at a time. I invented and used such a device back when I was making doll furniture years ago. I could just stick it in the box of nails and suck up a single nail. I had a couple different tubes for different brads. Worked great for furniture tacks as well.
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On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 10:42:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@the.shoppe wrote:

Why it worked so well with furniture tacks is because the slot in the tube would not allow it enough vacuum to pick up the tack by anything but the shaft and magnets don't work so good with brass tacks. <g> Try it.
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I've filed your good idea. Thanks.
-- Mark
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nails slip into the slot easily. I made them out of both copper and aluminum. If you're using brass escutcheon pins (those 1/2 little buggers are a bitch to handle) vacuum is the ONLY way to work :)
I used a vacuum device that I bought from a friend in the TV repair business. I can't recall what it was called but it was powerful and reasonably quiet and resided on the floor with a foot switch. I'm sure one of the many mini vacs sold for computers would work but I have no need for one. All my brad nailing is done with air nailers now and I don't use the decorative furniture tacks any more.
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Mon, Jan 29, 2007, 8:21am snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com (Upscale) doth sayeth: It could be a really useful tool for people with slightly unsteady hand motion when swinging the hammer. I taught leathercraft at a local hospital and experienced quite a few hits on the hand with the hammer when working with quadriplegics. Fortunately, most of them didn't have sufficient arm power to build up a really heavy swing of the wooden hammer.
Yup, you're absolutely right. I'm so used to doing stuff for myself, somehing like that never even occurred to me. I dislike wooden hammers tho, I like turned mallets, easier (and faster) to make, and I think easier to use.
JOAT Bugrit. Millennium hand AND shrimp.
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