Loose tenon joinery

Page 2 of 2  
-MIKE- wrote:

In my ken, hide glue is the only glue up to this point suitable for woodworking that will glue/adhere to itself. For a joint to be totally repairable at some point, as all glue joints will at some point fail, it helps to be able to dismantle the piece and hide glue is the best bet so far up to this century.
Epoxy is probably the best bet for longevity, but it is expensive, and forget about getting anything glued with epoxy apart; and urea formaldehyde glue may be the second best choice because it is much cheaper than epoxy, easier to use and because when it does fail, you can "repair" it, once, with epoxy, for another hundred years. :)
That said, I'm still using PVA's on most things, and urea formaldehyde glue (Weldwood, Urac 185 (?), etc) for long open times.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Swingman" wrote:

"Expensive" is a relative term.
Last time I bought a gallon of TB-II it was about $20.
I don't pay even close to $20/gal for epoxy, but then I buy it in 500 lb (55 gal) drums.
Retail, a gallon of epoxy is probably about $60 these days.
Somehow, I think the cost of the adhesives used in a project gets lost when compared to the cost of any of the following:
1) Wood 2) Finishing materials 3) Hardware.
BTW, slow hardener and laminating epoxy resin will give at least 30 minute open time @ 75F which is a whole lot more than TB-II.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

IOW, 3 times the price, and much more in smaller quantities ... nuff said. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Swingman" wrote:

3 times the price for equal quantities: however, 3 times a small total cost percentage is still a small total cost percentage.
Nuf said<grin>
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where do you get retail pricing like that?
As a point of reference Lee valley sells epoxy for about $40/quart
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p 011&cat=1,110,42965
-Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C & S wrote:

Here, for one... http://www.uscomposites.com/epoxy.html
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"C & S" wrote:

Almost anybody who is in the epoxy business.
Try System3 for example.

Obviously not in the epoxy business.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-MIKE- wrote:

According to Bob Smalser (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t !822) the others are repairable with epoxy. No data on whether they are repairable with themselves.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Friesen wrote:

Thanks for that info. Does that mean that epoxy melts into them or reactivates them in some way? Or just because epoxy will adhere to plastic?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-MIKE- wrote:

Just that epoxy will adhere to the previous glue. And it's gap-filling, which helps if the previous joint members have been deformed slightly.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just conjecture considering glue can obviously fail over time.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 17 Apr 2009 12:27:09 -0500, the infamous Swingman

I wish I still had that link I saw eons ago. It had a video of all the joint types (dowel, loose tenon, biscuit, integral m&t, lap, miter, etc.) being tested with strength charts afterward.
Here's one newer destructive test site: http://www.dowelmax.com/jointstrength.html (totally bogus, IMHO)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhLfb7m9Fug
Much more scientific. I wish they had shown the data for pinned (but not glued) m&t joints.
As usual, a lot of variation comes from loose fit, so remember to fit your tenons (loose or integral) snugly for the best durability.
------ We're born hungry, wet, 'n naked, and it gets worse from there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are very few down sides... much faster and much less setup with a proper jig.
The only thing is to watch your reference side. That can be a slight problem until you screw up a few pieces.
There are MANY jigs out there to do this with...
http://www.shopnotes.com/issues/090/extras/plunge-router-mortising-jig /
or
http://www.shopnotes.com/issues/088/videos/open-floating-tenon-joinery /
my favorite:
http://www.woodsmith.com/issues/147/videos/setting-up-and-using-the-router-jig /
John B wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Advise, LOL. IMHO the more mortise and tennon joints you use the stronger the project joints will be. The easier it is to create loose mortise and tennon joints the more you will use them.
Buy a Domino NOW!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, considering how much you've used yours lately, you must be getting really sick and tired of it. So, I'll help you out and offer you $100 for yours including the vacuum. Hell, I'll even pay the shipping to me up here in Canada.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Wow! you missed my sell point by $25. LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RE: Subject
Think biscuits.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.