Just an underpowered table saw?

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I just put a new 10" 50 tooth Freud thin-kerf combo blade in my sears 3HP table saw and proceeded to cut some 3/4" poplar into 2" wide strips.
The saw got bogged down and seemed to really struggle. I even had a few burn marks along the cut edges.
Am I asking too much from this saw? Should I use a straight ripping blade?
Also, how high above the wood should I raise the blade? I assume the lower, the safer, but, being higher seems like it would cut downwards more instead of at a lower angle.
In my case I had the blade up about 2 1/2".
I realize the saw is probably not worthy of a Freud blade, but, I'm trying to make the needed cuts with what I have.
Glad I didn't go with Red Oak for this project.
Appreciate any suggestions.
ThankX Ron
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Something is wrong, especially for 3 HP. My 1 1/2 hp saw will cut 2" thick with just some slowing down. 3/4" goes like nothing at all. If you have burning you may have mis-alignment and that can cause some problems.
Things to check: Defective blade Saw badly mis-aligned (blade, fence, or both) Slipping belt
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Ed Pawlowski writes:

Or the wrong blade. A 50 tooth blade is NOT a rip blade. The smallest tooth I've seen on a 10" finish rip blade is in the 40 tooth pattern. Most finish rip blades have 30 teeth and glue line rips have 30 to 24 teeth. Combination blades with 50 teeth are going to struggle in ripping.
To me, it makes sense to use the correct blade for the job.
Charlie Self
"Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them." H. L. Mencken
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I believe the saw came with 2 - 36 tooth blades. I'll put the as yet unused / new blade on an give it a try. I'll check the alignment again after I install it.
ThankX again, Ron

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Sure, but I've done on often with a Freud blade. It should be able to handle 3/4" with little strain. OTOH, after posting a reply, I realized he is not talking a 3 hp cabinet saw but a 3 Sears hp saw, probably less than 1 real hp. Ed
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"Charlie Self" wrote ...

While I agree entirely with what Charlie says, I have ripped thicker stock than that with my 60 tooth blade when I was too damn lazy to change it out. My saw is a 3 hp Unisaw and it cut through like a hot knife through butter.
That being said, either something is wrong with your motor, or it is possible that there is something wrong with the wiring in the circuit it's on. Too many things on the same circuit will draw enough power that you are starving the motor and ruining it. It would also result in poor performance.
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Howard Ruttan writes:

Yeah, but his is NOT a Unisaw. I've used my Unisaw to cut 2" oak with a combo blade. Fortunately, just a couple pieces, but...it works.

I think he's probably running ye olde basic 1.5 HP contractor's saw, which is the reason he absolutely needs a correct blade, or, at worst, one that is less incorrect.
Charlie Self
"Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them." H. L. Mencken
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On 29 Nov 2003 09:34:45 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I easily rip 3/4"+ dry hardwoods all day long with a Freud 50T on my 1 1/5 HP Jet. I'll bet his saw barely makes 1 HP. He could also have some alignment problems.
I only install a rip blade for green lumber or furniture parts over 5-6/4.
Barry
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Speaking as a person who has an old craftsman with a 1 HP motor, he's got a problem. I don't have any rip blades, (well, I do but I haven't used it), I use combination or cross cut blades. Most of the time I use a 40 tooth carbide, Sometimes a thinner 60 tooth, cheap blade and 3/4 inch stuff moves right through. Even when I use a hollow ground planer blade for glue ups, I don't have Ron's problem. It sounds like he has the blade too high, but that still wouldn't be the main problem. I run 1 and 1/2 stuff through my saw with no problem. My bet is that there is something wrong with the blade, even he doesn't have problems with other blades.
Charlie Self wrote:

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Charlies points are good...but I don't think that's the problem. I do almost all my work with an 80-tooth combo blade...and I can cut 1.5" oak with no problem on my 1.5hp Delta CS. You've got a problem with the saw, either mechanical or alignment.
Charlie Self wrote:

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Ron wrote:

Crikey... I know Sears lies about horsepower, but I don't imagine your saw could be any more anemic than mine. I have a Skil 3400 benchtop. I'm running a 40-tooth blade I think, Freud TK960. I've cut lots of stuff much bigger than 3/4" on it, up to resawing 2x4s and even 4x4 poplar timbers.
Sounds like maybe
* you're feeding too fast * your rip fence isn't parallel to the blade * your blade isn't perpendicular to the table, and it's tilted toward the fence * you're running without the splitter, and the kerf is closing up on the far side
Giving your saw a tuneup might really help. For some reason, I was convinced that my saw was just a useless piece of junk, and I never bothered to try to get it to work better. It still isn't a very good machine, but a couple days spent fiddling with it made a world of difference. It's at least useful now, and a lot better than nothing.

It would probably help. With a 50-tooth blade, I'd imagine you'd have to feed even more slowly than I do, and I have to go slow and easy on rips through thick materials. I do get some burning too, just not nearly as bad as I used to.

That's pretty much it. Lower = safer, less tooth exposure. Higher = less strain on the anemic motor, and I think (think, mind you, I might be wrong) less risk of a kickback.

Feh. If my piece of crap is worthy of a Freud blade, anything is. Putting a "better" quality blade on it really helped. I don't think it would have been wise to put a Forrest WWII on the thing though.

I know that feeling. Of late, I *am* using real wood for stuff, and it hurts a lot more when I screw up. It's a lot more rewarding though when I get something almost sort of close to right. :)
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I swapped blades with a 36 tooth one and it did cut a bit smoother.
Plus... comments below.

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That is when the (in)adequacy of your tools will be pointed out. Ed
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Silvan wrote i

Ron wrote:

And Sears has the cajones to call it three horse.
UA100, wondering if that special place in Hell is full of Sears ad writers/product descriptors...
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Unisaw A100 writes:

From what marketing people tell me, Sears doesn't have the cojones to NOT call these saws three horse. It's been going on so long, it's expected. Too, as one marketeer told me, "Everybody does it," which is almost true--check the HP ratings on routers.
Charlie Self
"Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them." H. L. Mencken
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On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 14:10:48 +0000, Charlie Self wrote:

From what I see, induction motors are rated fairly, it's universal moters that defy the laws of physics - things like shop-vacs, routers, circular saws, ...
Maybe the screaming coming from a universal moter is the sound of that unaccounted for power being sucked through the interdimensional vortex?
-Doug
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Doug Winterburn wrote:

You owe me a monitor!
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On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 14:15:12 GMT, Doug Winterburn

I have one of those 6.5HP 120v Shop Vacs! <G>
In today's world of marketing, the credo seems to be "Just say it!", regardless of the facts.
Barry
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In't that False advertising?
in message wrote:

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They have a way of hooking meter to it that says it is 6+ hp at full stop. While not an accepted method by engineers, it get around the advertising aspects.
I do recall some years back (maybe in the late 70's?) the auto industry adopted new standards for rating engines. At least if they all do it the same way, you have a little basis for comparison. Ed
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