Jet-JWTS-10JF Table saw

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Trying to figure out a way to upgrade to a bigger and better saw from my DW 744. Keep looking at the Jet that Lowe's now sells, which is I believe is the JWTS-10JF. I have my DeWalt on a Rigid Work-N-Haul it, the stand that HD sells with the Ridgid TS. I need to get the Jet on this stand to be able to get it in and out of the shed I keep my tools in(a 6 X 8'). The stand I have I hope can handle the weight of the Jet, what do you think here? I just hope I can handle wrestling the saw in and out of the shed and the 30" rails may make it a little awkward. To make room for the saw I am going to have to get rid of a small workbench in one end of the shed, where the junk on that is going to go, I haven't figured out yet. Another question I have is, can this saw handle the moving and possible bumping around? Will the Jet T-type fence be accurate enough till a possibly later upgrade can be done? Need some good advice here so I can plan and work this out while I save some more tool money. Thanks, I appreciate it.
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Paul O.
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Think I mentioned that my neighbor has had this saw for years and has turned out some very nice things!

Yeah, I think so. Again my neighbor hasn't upgraded anything on his, so he's pretty happy. I think he mentioned that if he ever did anything to enhance the saw, it would be to invest in thr CI wings.
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--
Paul O.
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Sounds like my saw. I don't remember the exact numbers and initials but I think it's the same. Been very happy with this saw. Building a stand for it to replace the factory should be pretty simple. Put some wheels on it and your set to go. Move it "sideways" i.e. put the wheels so it moves parallel to the fence and not parallel to the miter slot. Where the option exists, I'd get the cast iron wings. I have the stamped metal wings and as near as I can tell, they work as well as one could want. I still drool over solid (not lacework) cast iron wings.
bob g.
Paul O. wrote:

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Don't drool over the cast iron! (it will rust!!) I have the JWTS-10 with the cast iron wings. I am very pleased with the saw. I paid $550 for it at the Charlotte NC WW show about 4 years ago (and I keep it waxed in case I drool over it!)
Frank
Robert Galloway wrote:

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Great Saw.....
I put the Incra Fence system on it and it's a WONDERFUL machine!
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This Jet is an outstanding saw. I wrote a review about it on epinions when I picked it up a few years ago. I recommend rewiring for 220V (nice improvement in power). I also put it on the mobile stand available from Harbor Freight (which is identical to the one Delta sells as a much lower cost...HF has many items that are questionable, but the mobile base is great.) The standard fence is adequate, but I'm upgrading to a 50" Jet Xacta II fence (commercial version) tonight. I also found some excellent ideas from some smart folks for improving the dust collection to 'near' cabinet saw level at very low cost. If anyone is interested, I'll post the links. I was about ready to upgrade to a Jet cabinet saw or a Powermatic 66, but with the latest upgrades, I don't think I will.
-- Mark
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Mark wrote:

The extra voltage increases the horsepower?
UA100
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Short answer: Yes, because there is less IR loss.
r
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R: wrote:

Enough that you would notice without the use of a meter?
UA100
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Depends on the application and other factors. It made a huge difference on my Unisaw. Time to reached full speed on startup was cut by a factor of 4 or more. On small motors like the one on a Delta band saw doesn't matter as much to me. I don't do any heavy cutting on the band saw. There has been at least one recent magazine article extolling the virtues of 220 power.
I won't bore you with the details. People generally hate it when I get the formulas out.
r
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R wrote:

Can you bore us with which magazine ran the article?
UA100
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Yes, because there is less IR loss hence less heating. The horsepower is determined by the amount of temperature rise. Since there is less heating, the motor must develop more power to achieve the same temperature rise. Even so, the difference in power can be quite small. Jim
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and if the wire runs are reasonably short, it would be a *very* small difference.
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snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote in

Even on runs of 30 ft it makes a fair difference. It also depends on what gauge wire one uses. If one does not make any heavy cuts, it doesn't matter as much.
I used 12 ga wire and switching to 220 made a significant improvement.
r
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Sure! Unfortunately your electric bill doubles since you're using twice as many volts.
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You are only using half as many amps per leg also. Actually you use slightly less electricity because there is not the large strain and power usage on start-up to get to the running RPMs. On my mill/drill when I used 110v. when set at higher speeds it would often kick out the circuit breaker on start up, no problems after switching to 220v. Dick
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Richard H. Neighbors
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Sorry - forgot to add the " :) " to my post... :)
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That is not true.
Electricity is sold by the number of watts per hour not the volts or the current but the product of the two. Amps x Volts=Watts. The bottom line is that your electric bill stays the same. The plus side is that the little bit that would be converted to heat at 110 is dropped at 2220. You get more of what you pay for.
r
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Mark wrote:

Mark, Do you have the part number for the base? I have deen looking at HF, and can't fine it Thanks Frank
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