JB Weld - will it tighten old wood handles?

I have several wood handle sthat are loose on tools. Some are on my lead casting equipment which introduces the heat aspect. So, how do you take a steel prong in a wood handle subjected to say 800 degrees heat continuously (several hours) and insert it back into its original charrred wood handle and keep it tight? Would JB Weld work? Epoxy will come loose when subjected to heat; so will any glue. Drilling and pinning is not an option.
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800 degress is hot. But JB weld would be worth a try. I have used it for many applications and it has not failed. Most notable was nursing a few more years out of a dishwasher that was badly rusting in the drain area. It held up remarkably for 3 years and a dishwasher can be a pretty nasty environment. JB Weld failure wasn't the reason the dishwasher was replaced.
A lot a farmers in our area swear by it, and use it on engine repairs. It does take a full 24 hours to cure and I would suggest the original, not the fast cure.
Good luck.

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In casting bullets, the mold is held by a wood handle. After a few hours of casting, the metal prongs going into the wood handles gets hot as **** and chars the wood inside the handle. Been trying to figure out a way to stop it.
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My brother clamped some aluminum bar stock cross ways just below the handles for a heat sink to solve that problem
Tom J
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On their web site, its states it's good up to 500F
http://www.j-bweld.com/coldweld.html
On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:56:58 -0600, Lawrence A. Ramsey

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Wow! I amrunning around 800 degrees while castinga nd , no, I don't use gloves. Can't wear them; they get in the way. I always worked barbed wire without gloves though most don't. Just gotta be a little careful.
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internet.com says...

Youch! You can be careful with barbed wire, the only problem is that it's so unpredictable, especially when rolling it up, it tends to come loose and spring at you at the most inopportune times and places.
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Yep, just bought a thermometer. Been guessing for years. Of course, you run it a little hotter than necessary when doing heavy casting because you have to keep adding (cold) lead and melt it on the run.
On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 18:39:29 -0500 (EST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (T.) wrote:

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You know, Google will convert units for you too, so no need to find a conversion site: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&qP0+celsius+in+fahrenheit&spell=1
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (T.) wrote in message

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All good suggestions. Normally one only owns one mold or possibly two for a given caliber. It is a real pain to try to swap them out with a new set of handles while casting. I cast for hours so that make sit somewhat impractical. I do set them down on a wet towel or rag while letting bullets set up but after a while, you run out of rags/towels, etc. The idea of a little aluminum finned heat sink is interesting though. Gotta think on that one for a while. Thanks!
On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 13:59:27 -0500 (EST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (T.) wrote:

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I have had some excellent results with Durham's rock hard water putty. Once dry, it should be good to go with the heat, though I have not had the need.
Camel back concrete trowels get loose with heavy use, the Durham's does a superb job.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Lawrence A. Ramsey wrote:

How many tools do you have? I do a little lead casting, and I have a shop-built crucible. For a handle, I use a super cheapo pair of imitation Vise Grips. It works great, *but* my crucible has a copper pipe handle, and it's easy to bite. Grabbing onto a steel rod would be more difficult, but maybe you could grind flats on it to make for better bite.
Also, my crucible is very light, used only for melting and pouring small amounts of lead at a time. If you're moving pounds of it around with your stuff, you'll need something better.
One way or another, I'll bet a pair of cheapo locking pliers would make a good heat sink to help avoid charring the handles in the first place.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Don't know about your handle problem but JB fixed a rusty air compressor tank and it is still going 5 years later.

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On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:56:58 -0600, Lawrence A. Ramsey

Fix the handle design. Modern bullet casting equipment has far too short a metal strip before the wood - everyone gets this problem with charring and the handles working loose.
I wouldn't use JB Weld. I'm not a fan, it stinks when hot (you're melting lead - like you care about epoxy !) and this is getting beyond its temperature range.
I'd weld on a steel extension, then use a welded steel spiral handle, like an Aga cooker.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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"Andy Dingley" writes:

Having recovered over 30,000 lbs of lead resource from things like used tire weights, spent firing range lead, etc, then melting it down and casting into 30 lb pigs, I have a little experience handling molten lead.
Also have laid up over 20,000 lbs of epoxy building my boat, so have a little experience with that product.
I totally agree with Andy.
JB Weld is great for a lot of things, this is not one of them.
Longer handles will solve the problem along with some heavy mitts or heat resistant gloves.
Have fun.
BTW, anybody need a couple of 500,000 BTU burners? They do a great job melting lead.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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Wouldn't either stainless or iron transmit heat slower than steel?
Mike
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On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 08:37:05 GMT, "Michael Daly"

Not so you'd notice. None of the steels conduct heat well, compared to other metals. And where can you get iron these days ?
If you want really posh, use titanium. It's a pig to forge, but it is becoming popular with smiths to make tongs from, as it has such poor conductivity.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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