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I have a very clunky right angle attachment that I have never worked out the tricks for. What exactly is yours? My googling doesn't come up with anything like you are showing ...
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Han
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I use this for driving screws in tight areas. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pX827&cat=1,43411,43417&ap=2
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Someone else posted the link:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
You'll notice that the one in my photos is missing a piece, an "angel's wing" shaped attachment that helps you grip the head and keep it from twisting. It's made such that it can be attached at different "rotations", or removed entirely. For this job, I found it was better to leave it off.
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Thanks, Greg!!!
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Han
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[...]

I solved a similar problem a few years ago by buying this right-angle drill: http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00911576000P
The drill has good torque and it's not very heavy -- but the battery life sucks.
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And I picked up this to solve my screw issues... (Amazon.com product link shortened)49619097&sr=8-4&keywords=milwaukee+right+angle+attachment `Casper
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That is in fact the one I used, minus the removable "wing" attachment. In my limited experience, I've found that it is sometimes useful and sometimes an impediment. In this application, it was the latter.
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On 10/7/2012 10:53 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I stupidly bought a Bosch angle drill, http://tinyurl.com/9n7bqjm . I would have rather had the Milwaukee attachment you guys are using. The Bosch is big and heavy, and I didn't need another big and heavy drill, I simply needed a nice, compact attachment like you have. Now I have yet another drill with yet more batteries. Not trashing the Bosch, it's a fine, but unneeded tool in my case. Also, from the pic, it looks like yours will fit in a tighter space than the Bosch angle drill. When I was buying, I saw a Milwaukee attachment but it was bigger and heavier than yours, or I would have went with that one.
PS, your "beehive" pic looks more like a hornets nest to me.
PS2, You don't have hardly any screwdrivers showing, I have close to a million, they proliferate like rabbits. I don't recall ever buying a screwdriver, yet...
PS3, Flex shafts suck, the ones I've used twist into a knot, usually wrapped around a finger or hand as soon as they face moderate resistance.
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Jack
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On 10/9/2012 2:12 PM, Jack wrote:

That's one of the reasons I chose the attachment. Through various accidents of history I have seven drills already.
Now I have yet

Perhaps, but it is a two-handed operation. There are always trade-offs.
When I

I may revise the title. It won't be the first time someone has "corrected" me on Flickr.

Strangely, you're the second person to mention that the 25 or so visible screwdrivers on that board seems an insufficient number. I probably have at least another 25 in my three portable toolkits, not counting mini sizes. And in fact, I hardly use any of them. Oh, the multi-driver in my electrical kit sees some use, and I do have the odd paint can to open, but otherwise, driving screws with a drill is quite convenient.

I actually got mine to remove the nuts that held on my toilet tank. The space was tight and the bolts were long and a little corroded. Even after loosening them the first turn, it was hard to turn them off by hand. And ratcheting them off 30 degrees at a time for the fifty or so turns that would be necessary was an unattractive proposition. The flex shaft (which is also in the photo) and a deep socket made short work of it. I never even bent down to look at the bottom of the tank, it was easy enough to do by feel. I've also used the shaft for other purposes.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Here's a right-angle attachement for a 3/8" drill ($20) http://www.harborfreight.com/3-8-eighth-inch-angle-drill-attachment-with-keyless-chuck-92188.html
And a right-angle drill ($18 less battery) http://www.harborfreight.com/18-volt-3-8-eighth-inch-cordless-right-angle-drill-67043.html
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How do you get by with so few screwdrivers?
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The better question might be, "Why do you need any screwdrivers at all?". Since the advent of cordless drills, my screwdrivers have lain fallow a good part of the time. But not to worry, I have a bunch more in my various portable tool kits as well.
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"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
More news for the novice end of the bell curve.
I built a couple of platforms today that will support some older Ikea "cubbyhole" bookcases. They came with what Ikea calls "plinths", but they were very thin, and I never liked them. Plus, a few weeks ago we had some minor water damage, which made the already unfavored "plinths" a little worse.
With my recent discovery of Kreg joinery, I figured this to be a short afternoon project. I was effectively making two "ladder" assemblies that would lay flat under the cubbies. I cut the long pieces to length, and then the ten crosspieces. Each unit would be 13" deep. (remember that measurement) Forty Kreg holes later (who was it here that laughed when I said I'd never run through the box of screws I bought?) I was ready for assembly.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/8061752031/in/photostream/lightbox /
But, it turned out that out the drill plus the square-drive bit were longer than the 11.5" space between the long slats. I probably have a shorter bit somewhere, but the geometry seems to demand either a long bit or a drill with a very small diameter chuck.
My solution was an angle attachment I bought for some previous home- repair debacle. It looks clumsy as hell, and it was until I worked out a good way to hold the drill and the attachment. But before long it became a comfortable and efficient method. So much so that this particular "couple-hour" project actually took a couple of hours.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/8061755376/in/photostream/lightbox /
I have needed my angle attachment many times. Sure got me out of a problem job. WW
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But then again, you could (horrors!) screw then in by hand.
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I suppose, but there were 40 of them. Does anyone screw in pocket screws by hand?
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On 10/7/2012 7:27 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Only when that is the only way. I have actually used a 1/4" socket and 1/4" ratchet to turn the driver bit.
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On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 17:27:58 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

In MDF yes I do!
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On 10/7/2012 5:27 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

You will learn that pocket hole screws bottom out very quickly and can spin quite easily. Depending on the wood, finishing with a ratchet driver is a better choice.
Plywood doesn't always grab the screws like you would expect.
The driver just spins them a little too hard at times.
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On 10/8/12 10:15 AM, Pat Barber wrote:

I always try to use a driver with a torque release. I get the proper setting on some test holes or the first couple holes of the project, then I hand tighten because I'm anal. :-)
One of the reasons I love Kreg pocket hole screws (and most generics) is because they design the threads so well for the material you are fastening. They even have a new thread designed for particle board.
I have found that it's pretty difficult to over tighten one of their fasteners, unless you're using a big-ass drill. I think those little 12volt compact drivers are the best tool for pocket screws.
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-MIKE-

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On 10/8/2012 11:15 AM, Pat Barber wrote:

I'll keep that in mind, thanks. Despite my relative inexperience with real woodworking, I have developed a pretty good touch for driving screws with a drill. I didn't encounter any trouble with either the 40 pocket holes or the 20 or so screws I used to attach the decorative molding I used for the front panel.
I should add that, as recommended here, I tried the Kreg pocket screws out for a non-pocket application. They really do grab nicely. In this case it was the coarse variety.
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