It's always a puzzle

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More news for the novice end of the bell curve.
I built a couple of platforms today that will support some older Ikea "cubbyhole" bookcases. They came with what Ikea calls "plinths", but they were very thin, and I never liked them. Plus, a few weeks ago we had some minor water damage, which made the already unfavored "plinths" a little worse.
With my recent discovery of Kreg joinery, I figured this to be a short afternoon project. I was effectively making two "ladder" assemblies that would lay flat under the cubbies. I cut the long pieces to length, and then the ten crosspieces. Each unit would be 13" deep. (remember that measurement) Forty Kreg holes later (who was it here that laughed when I said I'd never run through the box of screws I bought?) I was ready for assembly.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/8061752031/in/photostream/lightbox /
But, it turned out that out the drill plus the square-drive bit were longer than the 11.5" space between the long slats. I probably have a shorter bit somewhere, but the geometry seems to demand either a long bit or a drill with a very small diameter chuck.
My solution was an angle attachment I bought for some previous home- repair debacle. It looks clumsy as hell, and it was until I worked out a good way to hold the drill and the attachment. But before long it became a comfortable and efficient method. So much so that this particular "couple-hour" project actually took a couple of hours.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/8061755376/in/photostream/lightbox /
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On 10/7/12 1:25 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

You missed out... that gave you a great excuse to spring for one of these... :-) http://www.coastaltool.com/a/makita/btd141z.htm
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Yeah ... And It never seems to run out of gas. I've taken to charging the batteries on both my Makita impact driver and drill once a month whether they need it or not.
Shhhhh, but not so loud .... Leon might hear and post a video on driving Kreg screws in close quarters with a Festool. ;)
--
www.ewoodshop.com

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On 10/7/2012 8:22 AM, Swingman wrote:

Ha Ha ha!
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I didn't need to the whole of last winter. The lithiums kept their charge extremely well. My Ryobi LIons didn't, though. And the old HF nicads were dead every month. I got $25 for the set, about $4 less than I paid. <g> I love Craigslist.

Yes, shhhhh!
-- You never hear anyone say, 'Yeah, but it's a dry cold.' -- Charles A. Budreau
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Larry Jaques wrote:

NiCads and, I think, Lithiums don't like to be over-charged. In fact, HF says not to leave the battery in their (bare-bones) charger more than seven hours.
The fix for this is to obtain a time-limited switch. I got mine from Amazon for ten bucks. (Amazon.com product link shortened)49701710&sr=8-1&keywords=power+timer
and set it for six hours.
Plug the charger into this gizmo, insert the battery, and push the button. So far, my HF batteries have lasted WAY longer than previously.
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Should of course have been "news *from* the novice end..."

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Flexible screw driver extension works, also: http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=flexible+screw+driver+extension&qpvt=flexible+screw+driver+extension&FORM=IGRE
Sonny
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On Oct 7, 8:58am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have one of those also, and it has been very handy. But the fixed angle of the one I used makes it easier to keep some pressure on the bit. For this application, that made it the more convenient choice, at least for me.
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On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 08:01:14 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

That's one of the beauties of square drive screws. One doesn't _have_ to keep much pressure on the bit.
-- Energy and persistence alter all things. --Benjamin Franklin
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On 10/7/2012 2:27 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Not much, true, but you do have to keep the bit in the screw head. I think that's easier to do by pushing on the "butt" end of the adapter, rather than gripping the narrow cylinder of the flex shaft. Easier to keep it lined up properly too.
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wrote:

With either powerdrive (phillips) or square (robertson) screws, I hardly have to press to keep the bit in the screw. If you do, you are buying the wrong bits, the wrong screws, or both. The 1-2# weight of the impact (or screw-) driver is enough to keep it in the socket.
-- Energy and persistence alter all things. --Benjamin Franklin
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On 10/8/12 11:23 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

For the 15% percent of the time you are driving a screw straight down. :-p
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 10/8/2012 12:23 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Variable trajectory gravity hasn't come to my neighborhood yet. :)
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On 10/8/2012 11:02 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I like Philips over square heads, but I like torx over Philips. Only problem with torx is, like the square drive, it must match the driver. Philips gives you some slack. Still, if I were the screw god, I would change all screw heads on earth to torx.
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
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On 10/9/2012 1:12 PM, Jack wrote:

I worked with Torx back in the spring and wish all of my square drive were Torx. You can keep the Philips head. ;~)
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I'm with you, except when I have to fork over for Torx screws. ;-)
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wrote:

We had some Torx-head composite decking screws that were useless. They were cheaply made (but I'm sure not cheaply priced), and made it extremely easy to spin out the head. At least Phillips gives you a fighting chance to remove the screw if the head gets buggered up.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 10 Oct 2012 09:28:57 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

You certainly wouldn't say that if you used the SS Philips head screws I used on the deck in VT. The damned things stripped if you looked crosseyed and the only way to get them out was vice grips. A RPITA. I always go for Torx for large screws, now. Sheetrock screws, not so much. ;-)
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On 10/10/2012 5:28 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

I consider the ability to not strip out the head a feature. If the shank is breaking then either the screw is garbage or the material is too dense and not properly prepared, as in pilot holes, or the driver is over powered and not clutched.
I recently replaced the batteries in a Garmin Nuvi GPS. The battery came with a tool kit with 3 drivers, small drivers normally used in eyeglass or watch repair. REALLY small. One was the smallest torx driver I've ever seen. Good thing, because the tiny ass screw was so damn tight it took all my strength to break it loose, and I'm not a little guy. I don't think any other head type would have survived the stress being that small.
--
Jack
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