insulated paint storage

Have had great answers in past..let's see on this one.
Want to take one section of garage shelving (2x4 with brackets to hold cross pieces, 3/4" MDF for shelves, 24" front to back, 6' in length) and insualte it to hold paints/varnishes/glues/etc. Would merely staple foam insualtion to existing "box" (inside surfaces of shelving section), then put in cheap electic heater at lowest setting, cover off with 3/4" plywood panel (door) with perimeter seal (no insulation on door itself). Area to heat would 6'x 2' by 26".
Would this setup cause problems with the MDF? Do I need ventilation holes in the door to let moisture escape? Any other gotchas or just go for it?
Ouside temp is not bad but cold enough to have ruined some finishes before - don't want to repeat and don't want to cart the cans into house..
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"cc" wrote:

hold
This one goes in the "cheap and dirty" approach.
Buy some throwaway styrofoam coolers.
Store them on shelves off the ground.
String a 10W light bulb inside each container.
An alternate is to get a defective refrigerator before it gets the door removed.
Rewire the light switch to keep the light on sll the time.
If there any welders on the list, they will recognize the reffer trick as one they use for welding rods.
Lew .
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I suspect an electric heater is overkill. I'd start with a light bulb.
If you can find a cheap thermostat, then you have the temperature under control. Otherwise I'd put some sort of thermometer where I could see what was happening as far as temperature inside the cabinet.
Unless it was sealed up pretty tight with a gasketed door, I would figure that normal cracks and gaps would take care of any ventilation needed.
Tell us what you did after you do it!!!
Old Guy

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Old Guy wrote:

Or a couple--light bulbs burn out, using one for heat can be a recipe for disaster (says the guy who had to replace the water pump after the bulb burned out on a particularly cold night).
If you check with pet stores that do any kind of business in reptiles you'll find that they have 60, 100, and 150 watt screw in ceramic heaters (directly replace a light bulb) that are more reliable. Cost more up front but cheaper in the long run, especially if by not burning out at an inopportune moment they save the contents of the cabinet.

Can you still get the simple old fashioned bimetal type with mercury switch at Home Despot?

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--John
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

recipe
the
Next time, crack a faucet open and let it drip.
At least that is what we did when I lived out in the boonies as a kid.
Lew
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cc wrote:

My shop sees temps that are ~ -25 to -30. When I'm not there, it's not heated. I have a small cabinet that I've lined with SM styrofoam, and running around the inside perimeter of the cabinet is (for lack of a better term) heat tape. It's not a tape per se, but it looks like an extension cord. It's used to attach to copper plumbing to prevent it from freezing.
There is a thermostat in the plug and the thing kicks in at some temp around freezing. The cabinet stores my glues, finishes and water stones.
I can't speak to your MDF issue but the tape causes no damage to the SM, and keeps things warm enough to prevent freezing. BTW, this thing never gets hot. It's warm to the touch when it's on, and you could wrap it round your arm and not get burned.
HTH
--
Tanus

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I'd use a light bulb for heat, cheap (electric heater + flammables = no work shop). Seriously, I trust no small electric heater I can't see. In an enclosed space it's gonna overheat it might just kick a breaker or it could catch fire all to easily.
--
Mike
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