Inexpensive Wrenches

Page 1 of 2  

Anyone have a source for inexpensive wrenches sold individually? I'm putting together separate maintenance tool sets for each of my machines and I'd rather not shell out for Craftsman (much less Mac/Snap-On).
Thanks.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You'd rather round off the nuts and bolt heads? If so, check out Harbor Fright.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Yeah - that would be penny wise and pound stupid. I'm not planning on wrestling with any corroded nuts or bolts so I think the tolerances and quality of steel even in cheap wrenches should suffice. I'll use the "keepers" if I need to really torque something - which I shouldn't have to do if the machines are kept up.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HF has some junk, BUT my son and I have multiple sets of combination and impact socket wrenches from them. All seem to be the right sizes and have proved immune to much mindless abuse, like pounding with hammers to break things loose. We get the black ones, but I don't know if they are better than the shiny ones or not.
If you can tolerate the idea of low pay in the third world, they are fine.
BTW, we also have a couple of the 4" angle grinders, which have held up fine for a couple of years.
Wilson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did the same thing and it sure made life in the shop easier. Each machine has it's specific setup/adjustment wrenches, hex keys, etc stuck to magnets near the point of use. No more wasted time searching for them.
If you have a HF store near you they sell individual wrenches and cheap(in both senses of the word) hex key sets which are plenty good enough for the TS throat plate levelers, BS guide blocks, etc.
Art

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jay Pique wrote:

Harbor Freight, Ace Hardware, garage sales, Cash Converters (franchised operation like a pawn shop only they just buy and sell used goodies including tools, etc.) Google to see if one's near you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Three 15 dollar sets of Stanley combinations and two of hex keys did it for me. Mix and match, with hex keys held on magnets, wrenches hanging on hooks. Color code the hex keys, because you may have metric/imperial problems which old eyes can't easily resolve. Tape works fine.
Sockets are one set garage, one set workshop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I usually go with the blue or orange BORG's house brands.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Snap-on, off eBay. My machines tend to be big, old and English. So a lot of their nuts are either imperial, or even Whitworth. As size isn't such an issue with woodworking machines as it is with cars, then they only use the same couple of sizes for everything - no 14mm and 18mm heads, just to fit in the tiny space.
So when those one or two odd wrenches and sockets go past on eBay, I grab them - usually cheaply, because none of the car fettlers are interested. They're usually got the owners name on, and all seem to be Canadian Snap-on for some odd reason, but they work fine for adding to the machine toolsets.
My own car-fix box is of course full Snap-on (or Facom) Cost a bloody fortune and several years that lot did, so I don't want to leave odd ones wandering around the workshop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Dingley wrote:

Good old snap-off, I'll stick with my Britool and Metrinch for most things, but snap-off screw drivers and deep sockets are almost unbeatable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 13:42:52 +0100, Andy Dingley

What's Whitworth?
Thanks, Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

About twenty shillings. ;)
Whitworth is the bastard size used on Triumph motorcycles and such. http://www.mototools.com/Whitworth.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Whitworth is an Imperial standard invented before the USA was discovered, but I am surprised as the USA is so backward in adopting the otherwise worldwide metric measure that they don't still use it for everything. Especially as it is such a rough and ready style.
--
John G

Wot's Your Real Problem?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, since it costs no more to get things right:
<<Joseph Whitworth (1803 - 1887) was a British mechanical engineer and tool maker who was also responsible for establishing precision measurement and manufacturing standards. >>
I believe ~1848 is the correct time frame for the standardization. US dates from either 1776 or 1789, depending on your desire.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Whitworth is the only thread standard that makes sense, everything else that came after it was a retrograde step.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 00:14:23 GMT, Ba r r y

Whitworth was a thread form designed specifically for use in cast iron (as there was little else in use at the time). So even in the modern world, it still has a use. Under 1/2", it's the same as UNC (within a whisker). If you tap metric threads into cast iron you can often have problems with poor thread form or thread stripping (the coarse metric series is rarer than Whitworth).
Whitworth / BSF (British Standard Fine) have much the same relation as UNC / UNF. Although I maintain a full set of Whitworth tools and do still use them, the BSF kit is just there for historical reasons. I remember my Dad hauling scrap brand-new BSF tap and die sets by the ton load a few decades ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Since we are both in Ann Arbor, I would be interested in what you find here. I have a Jacobs Power Collet that I have installed on my router table. It might work for everything, but from what people tell me, I will probably use the standard collet for some things like larger bits.
The nut on the Power Collet is 1 1/4 inch and with all my wrenches, I don't have one that large. Harbor Freight has a jumbo set, but it costs $29 (as I recall) on sale. I did not see (and did not ask) if they had singles, so if you find one, let me know
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
eganders wrote:

Will do. Coincidentally, I am right now looking at a flyer I got in the mail for a "Cummins Industrial Tools Truckload Tool Sale" that's taking place right here in town today. Looks like Harbor Freight quality, but maybe they'll have the odd wrench for sale cheap. Further bulletins as events warrant.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
eganders wrote:

Wrong set. The Jumbo set currently on sale starts at 1-3/8" 1-1/4 is a bear, you could have a small size sets and a large size set and still not have a 1-1/4"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Garage sales??
I've picked up several old wrenches and odd sockets out of "bargain boxes" at garage sales...
of course, you could just convert as many as possible to allen head and hang an allen wrench on the machine with a magnet..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.