Ideas for lifting heavy maple table top

I'm building a workbench whose top will come from an older school workshop benchtop. It's 5' x 5' laminated 8/4 maple, and darned heavy (I'm estimating 170 lbs or so). Currently I'm working on it on my smallish screened-in porch, and occassionaly I'd like to flip it up horizontally (onto a small but sturdy table) as well as work on it vertically. I have to do it alone.
Any tips?
Archemedianly yours, H
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Grunt. That's why it's called wood *working*.
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Well, my first thought is that you need to put a pin through the axis, so you can spin it from horizontal to vertical with very little effort (think "paddle wheel"). Then to lift it up and down, I was thinking of either a pulley type arrangement (hooked to the ceiling) or some form of gear/chain combination to crank it up and down. The pulley arrangement would probably be the easiest to set up, and having it move up and down a track. Maybe some pins to hold it at a particular height.
If you're feeling industrious (industrial?), you could put it on hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders to raise and lower it.
Clint

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hylourgos wrote:

As your sig implies, the obvious approach is to not lift it all at once, just lift one end at a time working it like a lever and rely on walking and sliding it. You should never have to lift more than half the weight.
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FF


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Actually the second lift from the other side will be more than half the weight and that will decrease to half weight as the table top becomes level.
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Leon wrote:

I don't remember how long the slab is but if 1/4 of it extends above the tabletop then that quarter will counterballance some of the weight, using the edge of the table as a fulcrum, and so you'd still only be lifting half the weight.
OTOH, the table may tip over, and if the slab is resting too steeply on the edge of the table then it will want to slide down when the bottom is swung out.
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FF


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I'm not sure which applies, but you can do a lot with creative use of fulcrums and levers, block and tackle, and/or hydraulic jack. I took my 400 lb table saw off the mobile base when I had back trouble without a problem - using long 2x4 lever and a box for a fulcrum lifting once side at a time. I mounted an attic stairway by myself using a block and tackle hung from the roof joist.
Sorry I can't be specific since I don't know the particular geometry of your porch, height at which you'll be working etc. I just wanted to throw out some stimulating thoughts.
Bob
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Hire a couple of well muscled college students to help you out with it. Most will work very cheap just to earn a little cash.
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Grab, lift.

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hylourgos wrote:

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