I Set My Teeth, Again

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Fri, Jul 28, 2006, 2:15pm (EDT-2) dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca (DaveBalderstone) doth clameth: The mistake many people with JOAT's posts is thinking he actually wants some sort of response to them. 99 times out of 100, he wants no such thing but is just posting for the sake of posting. Unless there's actually a "?" in his post, assume he wants no reply whatsoever and that he will respond snarkishly to same.
Well that's an interesting opinion. Unless I specifically ask a question, I'm not really after responses, just as you say; however, it doesn't bother me if people do respond. Didn't know "snarkishly" is a word. But if the occassion calls for it.
JOAT Politician \Pol`i*ti"cian\, n. Latin for career criminal
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J T wrote:

Wow, I'm impressed (and I don't mean that sarastically). You are really hardcore. I would've just bought a new blade.
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Wed, Jul 26, 2006, 6:27am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (bf) doth exclaim: Wow, I'm impressed (and I don't mean that sarastically). You are really hardcore. I would've just bought a new blade.
You may have the wrong idea. This is not the same blade that broke then repaired, it's a new one. The old one I shapped into pieces 2-3" long, glued the pieces between scrap pieces of wood. Grind the blades to shape, sharpen them, and you have handy little knives, for marking, whittling, chip carving, whatever. Keep teeth on a few and you have tiny little saws.
Hardcore? About woodworking? Hah! But if I'd just bought a new blade I'd never have known if doing this would work.
JOAT Politician \Pol`i*ti"cian\, n. Latin for career criminal
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I'd be interested in knowing the brand of blade you have been using. Have you ever used a Timberwolf blade? They are very good. Donna Menke
J T wrote:

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Wed, Jul 26, 2006, 6:03pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Donna) doth query: I'd be interested in knowing the brand of blade you have been using. Have you ever used a Timberwolf blade? They are very good. Donna Menke
Dunno. Possibly a Sears brand. Not used a Timberwolf yet. Doesn't matter what brand it is, because I'd be willing to do the same to any blade if it didn't work as I wanted. I pay for it, I can modify it - that's one of my mottos. Beats tossing it and paying good money to buy another one, then hope that one works like I want. Besides, doing things like that is good for the soul.
JOAT Politician \Pol`i*ti"cian\, n. Latin for career criminal
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J T wrote:

Is tooth setting the problem or is it your saw guides? In particular, for cuts that veer off to one side or other, check the roller bearing behind the blade. On my Delta 14" there was so much slop that the blade would slip off the face of the bearing and angle sharply to the left (my left when facing the saw). I inserted a brass shim on the inboard side of the hex rod (or is it octagonal?) that holds the bearing so it will face square to the back of the blade. Also, binding could be a result of too little tension on the blade.
I'm thinking of ordering Carter's guide assembly. It's about a third of what I paid for my saw, but it would allow me to set the guides with much more precision than the stock setup on the Delta 14". These saws (Delta, Jet, Grizzly) are built to sell for a price... they lack precision in important areas. Upgrades like Carters are a good compromise between a cheap saw and a premium priced 16", 18" saw.
Cheers
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Thu, Jul 27, 2006, 9:13pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (drifwood) doth queryeth: Is tooth setting the problem or is it your saw guides? In particular, for cuts that veer off to one side or other, check the roller bearing behind the blade. <snip>
Like I' said, I've fiddled with everything possible on the saw - buides, bearing, tension, , etc. Zip worked. Until I set the blade. No biggie, I don't use it that much anyway, but now I'll use it more. When I get a new blade, I'll fine-tune the saw first to see how it works, and if need be I'll set the teeth again. No prob.
JOAT Politician \Pol`i*ti"cian\, n. Latin for career criminal
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On Wed, 26 Jul 2006 02:44:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Any chance you just don't have a long enough fence? Tough to control that last 1" properly, at least on my bandsaw- and it almost always tends to be my error. Watching carefully, I found that that little jog at the end was coming from pushing on the back corner furthest from the fence to feed the piece, and that was causing it to rotate just a little around the last inch or so- kind of like the blade was acting as a pivot. Using a push stick in line with the blade seemed to help a bit, though it didn't do the push stick any favors.

I usually use the barrel of a phillips screwdriver, myself. Tweak a little, test on scrap, tweak some more, ad nausem. I figure it saves me about $10 on every blade if I just get the Farm and Fleet ones, and play with them for a little bit. That, and like you said, it's good for ya.
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(J T)

It don't matter what you say, it's not even getting through. SOME people type for the sake of typing, others are sincere when they ask how do I, how can I. This cantankerous old fool.....nevermind.
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Fri, Jul 28, 2006, 8:17pm snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (TimTaylor) doth burble: It don't matter what you say, it's not even getting through. SOME people type for the sake of typing, others are sincere when they ask how do I, how can I. This cantankerous old fool.....nevermind.
Apparently. You seem to be confused, You quoted Prometheus, so I take it your post is directed at him Terrible things to say about him and terrible names to call him.
However, on the off chance you were trying to direct your post toward me, I will attempt to make it clear to you.
I posted about something I had done, something that worked for me. I paid for the blade, so I could do what I wanted with it. You probably would have really gone ballistic if you'd read my thread about using a power planer on a chunk of wood in a running lathe. Now that one was fun.
There was "no" question asked by me, so don't know where you came up with that. I'm not old, and "I'm" not the fool. You might want to look up cantankerous too. Have a nice next life.
JOAT Politician \Pol`i*ti"cian\, n. Latin for career criminal
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Fri, Jul 28, 2006, 7:02pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@business.org (Prometheus) doth state: Any chance you just don't have a long enough fence? <snip> Using a push stick in line with the blade seemed to help a bit, though it didn't do the push stick any favors. <snip> I usually use the barrel of a phillips screwdriver, myself. <snip> like you said, it's good for ya.
Fence? I'm supposed to have a fense now? Nope, no fence. Never thought about one. Just using the small sled I made. Fence, eh? I'll ave to think on that one. Push sticks are born as sacrifices.
Interesting. Never thought about sumpthin' like that. I've got the saw set, so will probably stick with it. But if I didn't have it I think next time I'd use a body hammer on the edge of a chunk of rail. That or grind a pair of pliers. It's all good.
JOAT Politician \Pol`i*ti"cian\, n. Latin for career criminal
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Hey Ed, here's a bit more info. http://www.nhra.com/dragster/1999/issue05/racing_technology.html You can read it all, it's not that long, or just find plywood.
In my case, with my paricular engine combo, I think simply minimizing heat transfer to the carburetor may benefit me more than anything. But it don't matter, it are all good for the soul, and I'll probably 'spearmint. Do you think a plywood spacer painted yellow would work best? LMAO
JOAT Politician \Pol`i*ti"cian\, n. Latin for career criminal
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