I found out how not to do it...


I have two 1"x1"x27" pieces of oak. I needed to cut 3/8" dados in them, about the middle, to accept 3/8" dowels flush. I suppose a square bottom would be okay, but I had a round bottom in my mind.
I stuck a 3/8" straight bit in my router table and pressed the side of the piece into it. Because it was not quite long enough, I did one part, and then flipped it over than did the rest. The first 1/4" was fine but after that it got very hairy. It was not a safe process at all; the router was very eager to grab the wood and throw it. Slowing the router way down helped, but not enough. How could it be done properly; besides a 3/8" file?
I suppose I could have drilled a hole in the wood and removed the balance with a file. Any other ideas?
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Toller wrote:

Use a 3/8" round nose (core box) router bit:
http://www.woodtechtooling.com/Whiteside/WhitesideCarbideTippedRouterBits.html
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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If I understand you right, you needed a dado across each piece at about the middle. I would clamp the pieces to the miter square and make several light cuts, raising the bit each time.
Or maybe you needed a dado lengthwise down the middle of each piece. In that case, I would set up the router fence at the proper distance, then clamp another fence down parallel to it so the piece is trapped between them and can't pull away from either fence. Then make several light cuts raising the bit each time.
DonkeyHody "Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."
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After re-reading your post, I finally came to understand what you meant. I got it wrong both times before. How about a good, solid stop clamped to the right end of the fence to be sure the router couldn't take the piece away from you? Place the end of your stick against the stop and then rotate the piece sideways into the bit.
DonkeyHody "Sometimes the old blind hog goes hungry."
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have required 8 setting; 2 pieces x 2 dados, x top/bottom. Instead of rushing into, like I usually do, I could have take a little time to lay it out properly so that there were only two distances.
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Toller wrote:

Never forget, the most important tool in the shop is the thinking chair.
Lew
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B.
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"Buddy Matlosz" wrote in message

Around here its called the throne, it's in the library, and it's where I sit to decide your fate ... you just better hope everything comes out alright.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
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saw?
On either the saw or router, feather boards came save life, limb and underwear..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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While not a deep, I have made 3/8" wide stopped through dados on my router table also. 1000's through Ipe. You are moving the piece from right to left? And or try a spiral or end mill bit.
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Do you have access to a mill machine?
If I understand you correctly, you want something like this:
(use monospaced font)
____________ ____________ / /| / /| +-----------+ | +-----------+ | | | \| | | | \_/ | | | |/ +---------------------------+
This would be very easy with the proper bit on a mill machine. You could do it on a drill press with a cross-slide vice, but to avoid stressing the drill press too much, I'd slightly modify this idea:

Drill the hole, remove most but not quite all of the excess material with a file, then clean it up using the drill press and cross-slide vice as a mill machine.
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