How to Re-saw 9" On a 14" Bandsaw Without a Riser.

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I needed to re-saw an 8-1/2"x8' section of the 3/4" bamboo plywood I'm using for our bathroom(s) remodel to end up with a thinner piece to veneer the side of a cabinet.
I have an old Jet 14" bandsaw that, like most, can only cut 6" high. The more I read about bandsaws, the more read about how the guides aren't that necessary for a saw that is properly set-up and tensioned. That got me thinking.....
I decided to see how high I could cut without the guides in place. The saw's case only allowed about 7-1/2" inches to pass under it. I opened the front case and noticed the back case was a bit higher, but it still only allowed about 8-1/4" to pass under. So, I cut out another 1/2' from the saw case to allow my 8-1/2" plywood to pass under it. See the pic for where I cut the case and bent it back, near the bolt at the top....
http://xrl.us/bandsaw
Next, I needed to set up the saw as perfectly as I could. I adjusted the top section of the saw to correct for the wheels that were not perfectly coplaner. I bought a new 3/4" Timber Wolf re-saw blade and installed in on the saw. As I was tensioning the blade, the tires started to come off. They were original and pretty messed up, so I decided to instal new ones. After new tires, I adjusted the tracking and tension and ran some 7" scraps to determine where the blade was leading and marked it on the table. It was cutting straight and like buttah, so I decided to get the bamboo and go for it.
The short story: it worked and did a really good job. It cut straight and the blade didn't bow or wander throughout the height of the cut.
The long story.... the saw is way too underpowered for this, obviously. I popped the little 15amp breaker on the power strip in which the saw was plugged, so I plugged it directly into a dedicated outlet. The saw stalled out a couple times. Near the end of the total length, it was really bogging down. The blade was still plenty sharp and I think it was just taxing the motor too much.
BTW, I made the cut with the front case OPEN. I don't recommend notching out the case of your saw to get more height for a cut, nor do I recommend using a bandsaw with the case open. :-)
It's done, it worked, I'm pleased. I was asking way too much of a 30-ish year old bandsaw which was never designed to do what it did.
What this did prove, however, is that we rely too much on, worry too much about, and probably spend way too much on the saw guides on bandsaws. I think this experiment has convinced me to jump on board with those who preach that what's really important for getting great cuts from your bandsaw is high quality blades, properly set-up wheels, proper blade tension, and determining the correct lead angle of each blade before cutting.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Nobody!? I expected to catch a lot of crap over this. :-) Too long, maybe.
On 9/23/12 5:37 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Guess you were lucky you didn't push the blade off the wheels.....
That work for you? ;~)
John
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On 9/26/12 2:43 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Not rough enough, John. :-) Perhaps the new tires helped.
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

Nah, just no reason. Suppose you had a bandsaw that would already do the height you wanted. The upper guides would still leave the same amount of exposed blade so as long as you don't flop the wood being cut from side to side and as long as the bottom is flat one would expect what you did to work just fine. As long as you don't push to hard, no bearing surface at the back either.
The blade HAS been flopping around a bit though, I note the insert. Looks like mine :)
--

dadiOH
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On 9/26/12 2:51 PM, dadiOH wrote:

FWIW, the insert was like that the day I got the saw.
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-MIKE-

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Sounds to me like a missed opportunity to get a bigger saw...
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On 9/26/12 4:24 PM, Larry Kraus wrote:

Yes, I did. There's an 18" Laguna at our Woodcraft for $1500 and I'm foaming at the mouth. :-)
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wrote:

Well... you could have gone to a local cabinet maker and had them resaw your piece for only a few bucks. And, you bandsaw wouldn't look like it came in last place in a demolition derby! :-)
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On 9/26/12 4:33 PM, Gordon Shumway wrote:

LOL! Yes, I tried for a couple months to find a local place/woodworker who would cut it. Nobody's lawyers would let them.
If I had a car that went through the demo derby with just a little bend in the fender, I'd win every time. :-)
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Bad Mike!! Bad, Bad, Bad!

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On 9/26/12 7:26 PM, Roy wrote:

+1
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-MIKE- wrote:

Your resaw guide looks like mine. What is the eye-bolt for?
--
G.W. Ross

Any wire cut to length will be too short.
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On 9/26/12 4:18 PM, G. Ross wrote:

To attach it to the t-track that you can't see in the pic. The t-track is on the sliding fence from my cross-cut sled for the tablesaw. I like muti-taskers. :-)
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"-MIKE-" wrote in message
I needed to re-saw an 8-1/2"x8' section of the 3/4" bamboo plywood I'm using for our bathroom(s) remodel to end up with a thinner piece to veneer the side of a cabinet.
I have an old Jet 14" bandsaw that, like most, can only cut 6" high. The more I read about bandsaws, the more read about how the guides aren't that necessary for a saw that is properly set-up and tensioned. That got me thinking.....
--

That’s why I bought a thickness planer. To make thin boards from thick
boards. now that I have one, don't know how I got by without it. WW
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wrote:

8-1/2" wide strips? A planer would be my go-to tool.
-- Never trouble another for what you can do for yourself. -- Thomas Jefferson
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On 9/27/12 5:58 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

As I wrote in another reply, this bamboo plywood was $300 a sheet and I have plans for every square inch of it, including both sides of the 8-1/2"x9' piece that I re-sawed.
I used the planer to take one half down to about 1/4" and the other half will be planed down to its lowest spot and used for a medicine cabinet.
--

-MIKE-

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On 9/27/12 3:29 PM, WW wrote:

I have a thickness planer, and like you, I don't know how I'd get by without it. However, this bamboo plywood was $300 a sheet and I have plans for literally every square inch of it, including both sides of this 8-1/2"x9' piece that I re-sawed.
--

-MIKE-

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Did you spend all your money on the plywood, then? A riser block kit for a bandsaw runs in the sub-$100 range. I think mine was around $60 for the Powermatic kit. (It works just fine on the Jet saw, just doesn't look pretty).
The motor might not handle resawing at the full depth, but just because you have the ability to cut 12" with a riser doesn't mean you have to.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 9/27/12 11:29 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I guess the point is, I wanted to try it to see if it would work, before buying the riser and longer blade. If it didn't work, I lost nothing and I would get the riser and blade and continue. But it worked and the first project is done... I'm on to the second.
I also learned a lot about what's really important when re-sawing.
--

-MIKE-

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