How to get a 198 lb bandsaw off the truck?

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My Grizzly 14" bandsaw is on its way. Unfortunately, the "local" truck depot is about 75 minutes away (at best), so I'd like to have Grizzly's trucking company deliver to my home shop, since I paid for the mileage. I did ask Grizzly and they said that the saw in the box can safely be placed on its side, and 198 pounds is not much to lower from the truck. (I do have a hand truck to take it from the side of the truck to the shop.) Unfortunately, I cannot be sure I can get mid-day help to do this. I'm thinking some $$ inducement might inspire the driver -- it would be less than 60 seconds of help to slide it down the back of the truck to the ground. It's not as if I'm getting an 8" jointer. (Not yet.)
Any other ideas for doing this? Anyone know if the truck typically used for this has a slot in which I might hook a ramp -- like U-haul trucks have? Any homemade ramp designs? I figure that for anything <250 pounds a ramp would be an OK solution - even a steep ramp just for sliding the box. -- Igor
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igor wrote:

The truck that delivers it will probably have a lift. Make sure that Grizzly is aware that it's a residential delivery without a dock. If they won't send a truck with a lift, you might want to drive around until you see a dock nearby and then see if you can sweet talk the manager into letting you take a delivery there. There are insurance issues and so on that he has to deal with so it's a big deal for him and he'd be doing you a big favor, so be nice.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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My Grizzle 14" came without lift gate or any lifting device. The truck driver placed an old tire below the back of his truck and gently guided the package down (I was watching from my garage). After which we lifted the package onto my homemade 3'X4" moveable steel platform and helped me push it into the garage. It was like a piece of cake. He must have done it over a thousand times.

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down (I was watching from my garage).
Now you know how to get 50 gallon drums of oil off of the truck and onto the ground. Tire on the ground, drop the drum onto it's side, roll off the truck onto the tire, which is placed off center to the drum and the drum pops up off of the tire onto the ground and you roll into your shop.....
--
Rumpty

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That IS impressive. Wonder if it would work for a jointer?
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ranted:

Jointer crates are a teensy bit less round, Igor.
And I consider cast iron to be a bit more brittle than oil on most days, anyway.
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Hi Igor, I have done this with a Delta 14 inch bandsaw. Slide it out with you and the driver helping. Once on the ground, a handcart with a piece of wood across the bottom should do it. Make sure to tie the goods to the handcart! Good luck. Dave

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Griz used Oak Harbor Freight for my G1012 (18" bandsaur) and he unloaded it with his liftgate without being asked. I didn't arrange for a liftgate but they provided one. Your trucking company might also. Otherwise, wax up a tubaten and you + the trucker can easily slide 'er down to the ground. OR pop the crate open, remove the sub-100 lb pieces (motor, frame) individually, then drop the lighter crate off the truck. It only takes a couple minutes. Hand-truck 'em inside as he drives off.
I used a milk crate for leverage to get my heavy casting up onto the stand so I could assemble the entire bandsaw by myself that afternoon. It took about an hour as there was very little cosmolene to remove.
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Correction: the steel platform is 3'X4' mounted with two fixed and two swivel wheels.
I spoke with Grizzly's salesperson and the trucking company before delivery, that I don't own a truck or any lifting device. I suggest you call Grizzly and told them what I mention here.

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wrote:

Hi Igor,
First, the bad news:
As I understand this situation, the trucker is obligated only to get the goods to the rear lip of the truck.
Now, the good news:
I receive a fair amount of trucked goods, some much heavier than yours.
Never have I had any trucker hesitate to provide assistance, and when they have assisted, it has often been far beyond anything I might have expected.
All that said, you have the be prepared to lower the thing on your own just in case...
In the grand scheme of things, your package is rather light. With a friend, you could easily lower it to the ground with no equipment whatever.
Were I in your shoes, I would invite a friend over, or, if that were not possible, I'd have a pair of 2 x 10s handy for a makeshift ramp.
Whatever you do, have fun with it!
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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I share the same experience as Kenneth. I have received a 600 lb table saw, 600 lb planer, 450 lb, jointer. and several lighter items even without being at home when the deliveries were done. In some cases, I got the service even without paying the additional lift gate fee ($75 - $125). At the end, I have been happy with the services received from the shipping companies. On other hand, it has been unnecessary difficult to arrange the delivery with Grizzly. The other companies (Wilkes) have been more flexible in the shipping arrangements.
Although the bandsaw is reasonable light (<200 lb), you should be careful not to damage it during the transportation. Most bandsaws are preassembled and should be delivered in standing position - not laying flat on the floor.
Cheers, Ollie

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If he's getting the G0555, it's well packed, and on it's side is fine. IIRC, when I got mine in Williamsport, it was already laying on it's side when I backed into the warehouse to get it. They picked it up w/fork lift, we slid it off the forks into my P/U and it traveled 250+mi. on it's side, no problem.
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Nahmie
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CLIP

Is that Williamsport, PA? If so, tell me about the area... Thinking of relocating to near Lewisburg/Shamokin. All I've learned so far is to avoid the area near the river.
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Yes, it's the one in PA. The showroom is actually in the Muncy Mall, about 10-15mi East of Williamsport. I can't really help you too much on the area, as I'm only somewhat familiar with it. My daughter's in-laws live in Duboisetown, one of the Wlmsport suburbs.
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Nahmie
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with your questions and I'll be glad to answer what I can. If I can't answer them, I'll direct you to some of the people that actually live down there.
Bryan
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On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 21:49:53 -0500, "Ollie"

companies were good? And, what part of the country are you in? (I'm near DC.) TIA. -- Igor
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Kenneth wrote:

Yup. "Tailgating" the freight.

Especially if you, or someone in your employ, is, um, easy on the eyes. :)

I would *not* bother with a ramp. We used to have ramps made out of waterbed frames. Just about the same as two 2x10s, SYP. They were completely worthless. Too springy, not slippery enough; worse than nothing.
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I've had similar experiences... It seems like the more prepared you appear the more willing the driver is to help.
If its just a G555 though it won't be any problem. I picked one up at Grizzly, and my wife and I unloaded it off of our pickup without problem. Worst case, be ready to open it and take out as pieces... Scott
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i unloaded my 18" delta steel frame B/S myself. its not a big deal. lay it back into the truck. use your legs to slide it out the back untill its almost balanced. then get on the ground and tilt it down till it touches the ground or your 4 wheel cart. [thats what i used ] once it is stood up you can wheel it in on the cart or if you dont have one borrow a hand truck. im 47 years old and only wheigh 175 lb. if the truck is higher than half the hieght of the crate put down some forn of platform to get at least that high. leverage is key here. otherwise you can hurt yourself. my 115 lb wife and i unloaded a 400 pound dual drum sander the same way and she has a bad back. i didnt use the cart for this one. after we got it down i tilted it and she put a pipe under the front then i pushed it a little and tilted it back again and sliped another pipe under it a third pipe makes it much better as you roll it you put 1 pipe in front of the other as needed. enjoy the new saw.
skeez
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Igor,
I just got mine a couple of days ago and had the same situation. The trucking company said the driver would help, but I'd call to confirm in your case. My brother showed up for the holidays and he and I lifted it from the floor of a semi to the ground on a hand truck (dolly). The trucking company can reschedule a delivery to you for when you have help on hand (they did for me) if that helps.
Joe
igor wrote:

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