How powerful a bandsaw motor is powerful enough?

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Well, I think part of it is that the big bandsaws move 50% faster than the small ones; that has to help.
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I'll bet you have plenty of room you just haven't considered yet. A tablesaw wouldn't take up any more room than that big table and all those chairs in your dining room. Or you could just move the sofa out and put it there. You just have to get your priorities straight. Once you do that, you'll find the room.
DonkeyHody "The cheapest things in life are free."
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Band saws are wonderful tools for cutting crooked edges in wood. Table saws are wonderfull for cutting straight edges in wood. While you can do either on either saw each has it's best use. If you want to get straight edges with a band saw you will need a lot of skill or a planner and jointer to help out. Your best bet IMO is to make room to upgrade the TS or get a RAS and learn to use it.

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I have a friend with a big ass bandsaw... Very expensive and highly tuned.
He calls it the world's largest pocket knife when the conversation comes up about accuracy.
sweet sawdust wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

Have you ever seen the pictures/video of Sam Maloof freehand "carving" chair arms on his bigass bandsaw? Crazy. The only bit touching the table is one corner.
Of course, he freely advises that it is a very dangerous technique...
Chris
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494 horsepower. 493 would be to small.

scheme.
The
enough
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My 18" saw has a 2 horse motor and I haven't been able to slow it down, nor make it labour. I have some fairly fine blades at the moment (6 tpi down to 14) and the speed limit is inherent in how much sawdust the blade can carry out of the kerf. Lots of power to spare, in my opinion, on a 6" ripping depth. Might be different if I went to a 3 tpi blade, I can't say since I haven't tried yet.
-P.
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What I'd like to know is, if the OP goes for an 18" bandsaw like this, what does he do when he needs to rip two 20" X 96" pieces from a single sheet of plywood?
--
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net says...

He can do what I do: clamp an aluminium rail to the ply as a fence and cut it with a skilsaw. (that's where the two assembly tables come in handy: you cut between the tables). I get my ply and mdf panels accurate to around 0.5mm that way (~1/50"), which is way more accurate than I could ever manage on a common or garden tablesaw.
-P.
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

I cut those with my phone.
My plywood storage racks aren't in my own workshop and they don't have my business name over the door. OTOH I don't need to pay rent on the space, I don't have capital tied up in the vast range of stock, and best of all there's a a guy there with a lovely plywood panel saw who can cut anything I want to any size I want.
If it's a cut simple enough that I can describe it over the phone, I just have them do it before I pick it up. Tomorrow morning I need to pick up a sheet ripped into 16" strips. I could have ripped this down myself, but I'd need to tidy the workshop first to fit an 8x4 through the cabinet saw, and borrow a friend to help carry it. Having the supplier (Avon Plywood) do it for me instead saves me a _lot_ of time and trouble, and the extra cost of cutting charges would barely pay the extra tea bill of having assistants over to help out.
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wrote:

The only place near me that sells furniture grade plywood charges $3/cut. I have to get at least one to get it home, but hurts to pay for something I could do myself. I really have to get over that, don't I?
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wrote:

Especially when it's that cheap.
How long does it take you to make the cut(s) yourself? How much is your time worth? When you look at it that way, I'll bet that three bucks starts to sound like a bargain.
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If you can't rip 4/4 or even 8/4 as fast as you can control it with a one horse, you're going to want a real monster.
Better to consider your saw by the width of blade it will tension than the ponies in the bottom. That's where the accuracy comes in. Get something in the 18-24 range that will take a fairly thick 1" or better blade, and if there's an option, you can go for the higher rated motor. 20A (actually ~10 continuous) @ 230 will haul a couple horse easy, which is about the upper limit for single belt, so I'd look for double or ribbed.
Keep your tablesaw. You can maneuver everything you're using the bandsaw for over that top, and everyone needs a good flat assembly area.
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I had my eye on the 21" 3hp Grizzly. I just didn't want to be "penny-wise, pound-foolish" by not spending another $500 and getting either something better or more powerful.

You know, that a darn good idea. I would have to leave the space behind the BS empty anyhow; I can just stick the TS there as an outfeed table! I already, due to lack of space for anything else, use it as an assembly table and router table.
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Toller wrote:

I'm glad you decided that. It seems like it's a crapshoot about how much value you get for a used tool anyhow. You're better off just keeping the tablesaw. Get a mobile base. Push it into a corner or something when not in use. You're already using it as a router table.
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On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 00:46:47 +0000, Toller wrote:

Horsepower per se shouldn't make a difference in cutting speed--it's the blade speed and the blade design that decide that. As long as there's enough power to keep the blade going at full speed at the feed rate that you're using there's no advantage to be gained by more power.
How fast is it cutting, i.e. how many seconds does it take you to go through a foot of 4/4 oak?
First thing to check--is your saw a single-speed saw or does it have more than one speed? If it's not single-speed then make sure it's on its highest blade speed--if it's not that would cause it to cut slowly. Next thing, what kind of blade do you have in it? A blade designed for resawing thick lumber will cut more slowly on thin lumber than one that was designed for that purpose. The blades that come in bandsaws are usually pieces of crap. Every once in a while you may find a good one but don't count on it.
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--John
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Thu, Nov 30, 2006, 12:46am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@Yahoo.com (Toller) did post another question, that I snipped.
Well, if you're doing it for a living, I can see where it would matter. Somehow I don't think you're doing it for a living.
Me, my bandsaw is, I think, 1/3 hp. And it does evrything I need, or want, it to do. So, I guess that means 1/3 hp is powerfule enough - for me.
For you, why don't you just buy a small bandsaw mill and get it over with?
JOAT Democratic justice. One man, one rock.
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