How often do you check the setup of your TS?

Motivated by reading another thread (s), I have been reading about "TS setup": Checking that the fence and blade are perp to the top, and that the mitre track is parallel to the blade and the fence. If I'm overlooking anything major, besides making sure the saw is unplugged, please mention it! : )
Based on what I've read I would probably use a combination square for the first task, and a piece of wood with a brass screw for the latter (or a dial indicator?) along with a mallet if necessary.
I just found this link and found it refreshingly down-to-earth: http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/calibrate_sled1.htm
So that brings me to what I wrote in the subject line: "How often do you check the setup of your TS?"
To me, someone who doesn't yet own a TS, it seems that the fence is the least stable part of the system, assuming one doesn't tamper with the angle of the blade. Do you check your fence as suggested above everytime you move it? Or, only if you have a cheap fence, or something else? A "Magnetic Angle Cube" seems a nice way of setting the blade angle.
From what I have seen, a dial indicator might be a nice item to have. Is there one which "makes sense"? Seems like with repeated use too that the above mentioned "brass screw" might take a toll on the fence..
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

Every time I move it with an depth check; the fence again before each project, and the blade every time I use it.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hadn't really thought about this in the two years I've had my TS. I don't do routine checks at all, I let the wood I cut do the checking. So far, it has not produced a bad cut. Things do get reset when I change the blade tilt angle back to 90 degrees, or play with the mitre.
But if the fence seems to be causing straight, repeatable cuts, why would I want to mess with it???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
rich wrote:

Do you make a living with your table saw?

On your last project, did you make a large kitchen, with 25 + cabinets and their associated components, drawers, etc.?
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I check my power tools whenever I need a precision cut or starting a fine woodworking project. Life is too short for a crappy fence, my Beis fence is usually right on. One really nice plus about a table saw is that seldom it is out of tune, unlike a bandsaw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I check the miter gauge on my 1023s from time to time. It is the "stock" gauge that came with the machine and it is usually square. I probably check the fence once a year or so and have made one minor adjustment in about eight years. Also check blade alignment with table once in a while especially if I am doing close work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think you get to know your equipment and only experience will tell how often you "need" to check stuff.
I almost always check my miter guage. Since I have gone to a newer fence I checked it every few days at first but found it was holding quite well. So now I just check it after running some big sheet goods or orther things that might stress the setup. After I dialied in the top to the blade (to within 1/1000th) I checked it every few weeks and saw little to no movement, so now I would only check it if I started to see some burn or hear the back of the blade start to sing at the tail end of a cut.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a Jet cabinet saw. I used a dial indicator to check initial arbor run out just before the threads started when it was new. Got .0005

You can measure all you want. BUT I simply rely on my quality of cut. If the cut leaces me with nothing to suspect I don't check it. I typically have to look very close with the light shining just right to detect tooth marks if any. Good enough, typically the stock not being perfectly straight is the reason fot tooth marks and a pass or two with a scraper takes care of that.

Yes it does make sense but you don't need to use it often if any after initial set up of the saw. I have not had my dial indicator out in 10 years.

Again, cut a scrap piece of wood. Adjust accordingly.
For blade bevel I have again have had no reason to doubt the 90 and 45 degree stops on my saw but I will confirm with a digital tilt box, the one that sticks to the blade with a magnet. I mainly use it to go for bevels <90 degrees and >45 degrees.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Biesemeyer, brilliantly simple device, locks dead parallel every time. I can eyeball the cursor and scale to within 0.002" of width with no problem, very easily with a pair of dollar store reading glasses.

Drafting square sets both blade and miter angle. Gets used every time.
Your stock throatplate will need to be upgraded to something closer to flat if it's the usual die cast aluminum POS. Any dips next to the blade will make your setup worthless if you're ripping narrow stock.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Biesemeyer, brilliantly simple device, locks dead parallel every time. I can eyeball the cursor and scale to within 0.002" of width with no problem, very easily with a pair of dollar store reading glasses.

Drafting square sets both blade and miter angle. Gets used every time.
--
By drafting square, do you mean a plastic protractor, or something else?
Your comment on the throatplate below is well-taken. I'm surprised there
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Probably refering to a drafting "triangle", typically thin transparent or translucent triangles in 45-45-90 or 30-60-90 degree orientations. Not to be confused with a T-Square.

Probably about 1 with each new saw. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The two in combination can set any angle multiple of 15 degrees.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.