How much HP is too much for a 14" Bandsaw?

Page 1 of 4  
Recently acquired a decent 2 hp 110/220a motor, and am now wondering if it would be too much for my little BS. Has anyone had any experience with big motors on small bandsaws? Would this be the funny car of the woodshop?
Regards, H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20 Dec 2004 15:20:28 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu wrote:

No such thing as too much power on an electric motor - it won't go any faster or need throttling, it'll just keep the speed up better under load. It may even draw _less_ current than a smaller motor that's having to work at it.
I wouldn't go out and buy a 2HP motor for a 14" bandsaw, but if you've got it, you've no better use for it, the speed is right and you can arrange the mountings and pulley, then go for it.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Allen would't be pleased with your question.
Shame! Go for it!
Grrrooowwerrrr!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a cheap 12" Crapsman, aluminum framed bandsaw. It came with a 1/3 HP motor. It was not enough! I had a 1-1/2 HP motor laying around that I slapped into it! Works much better now! I don't think you can have too much HP! Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If all the lights on your block dim when you turn on the saw, you have too much horsepower.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

If all the lights go out, maybe, but just dim? No problem! Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An electric motor HP rating is what its capable of putting out. If you do not stress it, it does not produce any more HP than your existing motor. The only way to make it produce the full 2HP is to really load it up. So you are in control. Go for it.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Two horse 110 is stretching things, which make me wonder if it's not one of those 3450 cap start cap run types. If so, remember to change the pulleys.
The belt effectively limits the power available to the tool, but with a bandsaw's low torque requirements, shouldn't be a problem, just overkill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob wrote:

I wish my electric meter believed that.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nova wrote:

:)
What a testament to the failure of science education in the general populace (Bob, not you Nova)... :(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you saying my statement was wrong?
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 04:13:56 GMT, "BillyBob"
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

I feel that the quote below is because of two factors (rusty memories struggle up through the ooze):
- The motor is not running at synchronous spped eve with no load, so a larger HP motor wil draw fractioannly more.
- The motor will run at near-synchronous until it stall, then it will start to draw the (much) heavier "starting" current, although it's failing to do the job. Because it;s running at near-synchronous while it's working properly, the correctly-matched motor will use less power even when fully loaded. Less wastage.
However, if I had the choice as a hobbyist between a free 2HP motor and a $100 1 hp one, I woud use the free one for sure! <G>
http://www.eng-tips.com/gviewthread.cfm/lev2/11/lev3/47/pid/237/qid/18465
"4.2.2. Efficiency at Low Load When a motor has a greater rating than the unit it is driving requires, the motor operates at only partial load. In this state, the efficiency of the motor is reduced (see Figure 4.2 ). The use of oversized motors is fairly common because of the following conditions:"
"Replacement of underloaded motors with smaller motors will allow a fully loaded smaller motor to operate at a higher efficiency. This arrangement is generally most economical for larger motors, and only when they are operating at less than one-third to one-half capacity, depending on their size"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The difference is not that great at no load speed.

Typical loaded speed is 95% of synchronous speed. I don't know if that's what you meant by "near-synchronous". However when it gets near stall (break-down torque), the speed will be significantly slower. Breakdown torque might typically occurs at 70% of synchronous speed - quite a bit slower.

Your discussion of efficiency is accurate, but I don't think its relavent to the context of the OP's question - concern for damage ("too much for my little band saw"). Basically I was just saying that motor characteristics are such that it won't hurt the saw, if you don't force the saw to do things its not designed to withstand.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 04:13:56 GMT, "BillyBob"
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
hmmmm...having said that I have found a site that shows that motor efficiency peaks at around 30% of full load. It shows a significant blip there, then drops off steadily to 100% load / 80% efficiency.
Given that high efficiency motors are now being built using larger conductors than necessary, Bob may have a point.
????????

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One of the best writeups on motors I have seen on the internet is from our very own rec.woodworking FAQ:
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/woodworking/motors /
Another good writeup is
http://www.engin.umich.edu/labs/csdl/ME350/motors/ac/induction /
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

Well...... ;-) I made it 2/3 rds of the way to a mechanical engineering degree before switching to computer science. As an "inganeering" student I lernt alot about "conservation of energy" and the like. ;-)
If you hook up a 1 HP motor and it turns the band saw at "X" FPM, and then you hook up a 2 HP (or 10 HP or 100 HP or 10M HP) motor and it also turns the saw at "X" FPM, what is the larger motor doing to consume more electrons? Radiating heat? Shooting arcs in the air? Writing its congressperson? It takes the same amount of power to spin the same machine at the same speed, so if there is a difference in electrons sacrificed by the different sized motors it has to be due to efficiency differences in the motors and/or the motors sending the electrons off to do other things.
When my 14" Jet BS is running but not actually cutting wood, I haven't noticed the motor housing glowing red, or sparks jumping out of the motor, or letters to congresscritters coming out of the motor. Therefore I have to conclude that the motor is consuming only enough electrons to keep the the band saw mechanisms turning at a constanst speed against the forces of friction in the bearings, the unwillingness of the band saw blade to be bent and unbent, and the link belt groaning and complaining as it is bent and straightened. If you ignore internal differences in motors and hook up a 100 HP motor to the same Jet 14" band saw and it also drives the BS at the same speed, it is impossible for the difference of a single electron to flow through my electric meter -- unless the larger motor is shunting additional electrons elsewhere.
When idling at a stoplight, I'll bet a Chevette and a Corvette are *producing* basically the same HP, even though there is a substantial difference in their maximum HP. ;-)
-- Mark
P.S. Those who finished engineering degrees are invited to correct my mis/mal understandings. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Jerde wrote:

Just picking nits, the Corvette will be consuming more fuel because the larger engine has more and larger bits rubbing together and thus more friction. The difference will be small though.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Jerde wrote:

<snip>
Start up current. Have you ever seen a 2 HP motor wired for 110 volts dim the lights while it spins up? I agree that once the motor spins up the running current difference is only that needed to keep the more massive armature turning and overcoming more friction of the larger bearings of the bigger motor, but I imagine you could run a 1/2 HP motor for 15 minutes on the current drawn by 2 HP motor on start up alone.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 03:52:21 GMT, "Mark Jerde"

I think that the difference involved occurs when both are under load. A bull and a mouse can pull a small toy behind them a the same speed if the bull takes it slow and easy. If the toy sticks against something, the mouse will stall. The bull will destroy the toy, the something, and anything else that gets in the way. It's smart to not overdo it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.