how many times to use sandpaper

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I use the Granat in 120 and 180. I have not witnessed it tearing as easily as the Cristal paper, it tore easily. But the Granat is not as heavy as the Ruben paper. I am finding the Granat 120 lasting 4-5 times longer than the Ruben. Perhaps I'm a bit more careful but I'm really surprised as to how long the Blue Granat lasts.
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On Tuesday, April 19, 2016 at 12:16:49 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Next kitchen refinish I have I will be buying the Granat. My biggest probl em is the "pilling" of the old finishes on the paper causing them to be hel d above the cutting surface. A very common problem in refinishing.
I know there are a lot of spendthrifts out there, but as far as wood work a nd refinishing go (not addressing the fiberglass issue) using sandpaper unt il it is worn out is a false economy.
The most astute observation on actual use of worn paper in my opinion was n oticed above by John McCoy when he said " Beware of "polishing" rather than smoothing the surface,which happens if the paper is too worn."
You would really notice the difference if you did a lot of staining, dyeing and tinting of softer woods. Cutting paper gives a uniform surface and a "rubbed" surface will really screw up a good coloring job, especially aroun d burly areas. Years ago one of the guys on Woodworking Web (in the finish ing/refinishing section) made it a point to take a look at the surface diff erence between good sandpapers and then another look at the end results of using worn sandpaper. The results were the same under magnification. Both cheap paper and worn paper resulted in a "hairy" surface where the fibers were not cut away. Tested with a light coat of stain, the side by side diff erence was very obvious.
I like Ed's comment, too. "After spending $500 for wood for a project and 80 hours of time building it I'm not going to try and save $2 on sandpaper. " Been my mantra for years as it only makes perfect sense.
Robert
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I'll send you a piece. :-). I don't get pilling at all on cured oil finishes. I removed an oil stained and oil varnished top a day after applying the last coat. And that piece of paper did a lot more sanding than that.
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On Tuesday, April 19, 2016 at 8:10:31 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

No kidding, Leon. That is remarkable. For someone that sands a fair amount of finishes, the time to replace alone would make it pay the small amount extra it costs (over Mirka) back in no time.
Robert
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the edge of the piece, the paper shreds from the edge. It doesn't happen immediately but it shortens the paper life considerably (the grit lasts much longer than the backing).
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I'm not sure why that is happening. I bought a 10 pack 5", for my Rotex, some time last year. I have used 4 pieces on 12 different cabinets. And I sanded front and back FF's on both sides and the doors on both sides. And I did not worry much about glue squeeze out on the joints. That is more than 240 joints in stock less than 3" wide. I don't doubt you are having issues but I'm not seeing a problem. Maybe the stiffness of your pad.
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I was sanding about 40' of 2-1/2" x 3/4" ash boards, with inside corners along the 40', with 4" sanders. The RO125 really rips the stuff up but my ETS125 wasn't immune. I probably went through a half dozen sheets, some edges ripped almost immediately. It could have been a pad issue. I only have the default pads (medium, IIRC).
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On 4/16/2016 11:09 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Actually not. Sand paper that is worn out and and cutting slower like a higher number grit does not cut as fast a new higher grit paper.
If the paper does not feel sharp you are pretty much wasting time. And yes even 220 grit paper feels sharp when it is not worn out.
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