How many hammers do you think one needs?

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wrote:

My two hammers (one straight claw and the other curved) I bought 30+ years ago. Yep, Craftsman. They're identical (other than the claw). Of course I have an assortment of other hammers (though didn't think the OP was talking about 20# sledges) but only those two claw hammers. It's been a long time since they've driven a nail though. ;-)

There is a difference between them. I'm partial to fiberglass shanks. ;-)
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I've never tried one of those. I was thinking of getting one; I thought why not "live it up" a little.. ; )
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On Sat, 7 Nov 2009 18:15:17 -0800 (PST), the infamous RonB

Nor can I. Half the hammers I own were bought cheap, <$10. The other half were gimmes or inherited with other crap in boxes at Garbadj Sale closeouts, the "free" boxes. You can KEEP your titanium crap which cost you half a week's pay...unless you want to gift one to me. But I still might revert to the $3 HF waffler the very next week. Ah dunno.

Au contraire, mon ami. Zee 'ammair propair eez zee piece de resistance. (The proper tool for the proper fool, don't ya know?) The proper hammer for the job can make the difference between a nastyass job and a pleasant one; a pretty job and a hack. Choose wisely, weedhoppa. Your destiny is not set.
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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You Guys Suck :^}
You got me thinking and digging around: - Two Previously mentioned Metal Handled Craftsman Claw Hammers - Fiberglass Handled Stanley Claw, also inherited from my dad - Blade handled Stanley claw, gift - One wood handled claw, source unknown - Four varying sized ball-peen hammers - Two small, wood handled tack/claw hammers - One small-headed tack hammer - One plastic head mallet - Two maple/walnut chisel/carving mallets that I turned a few years ago - Rubber mallet - And since you guys get so picky, three sledge hammers ranging for 4 to 10 pounds (plus a 10 pound splitting maul) - Meat tenderizing mallet in kitchen
So there!
RonB
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Bill wrote:

I have three hammers:
Plumb 16-oz claw hammer (least used) Plumb 10-oz ball peen hammer HF 32-oz "non-marking" rubber hammer (most used)

I once bought an 88-cent special from 84 Lumber. The first claw fell off when I tried to pull a 10d nail, and the other while I was _driving_ a 16d nail. I drove down to Red Oaks Mill Hardware, bought the first Plumb, and haven't had a problem since. Mine all have wooden handles.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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I have a whole box of hammers.
2 framing hammers, one with a flat face and one with a knurled face, that I used in high school and college for summer jobs 3 general purpose claw hammers, one was my grandfathers. 2 ball peen hammers, one little from my Dad, on REALLY big that I inherited from my grandfather in law (GFIL). 1 roofer's hammer from GFIL 1 "jointmakers hammer" from Bridge City, a gift from the love of my life 1 "jointmaker's hammer" my Dad made from a piece of octagonal brass stock (he made everything he needed or wanted) One tack hammer that was my grandfather's and Dad's before me 2 sledge hammers, 3 lb, I use to break rocks (I'm a geologist by profession) 1 rock hammer (see previous) 1 maul for splitting firewood
Plus 3 wooden mallets for hitting chisels and stuff Plus a rubber mallet for hitting my kids and stuff
If you want more, check out the catolog for The Japan Woodworker. They got all kinna' hammers for just about everything. (Disclaimers apply, I'm simply a satisfied customer and they have a great selection of tools).
-Zz
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Zz Yzx wrote: ...

...
Including the tools w/ which he made them, no doubt... :)
(...seen that, been there, too...)
--
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Exactly. He made a stationary disk sander out of an old washer machine motor. A battery charger made from the alternator of a car I wrecked (hooked up to the motor on the table saw). A smoker out of an old refrigerator, with the firebox in the old motor/compressor box. Then he made a compressor out of the refer compressor and an old beer keg. I remember him using the "scarry sharp" method on chisels in ~1960, using the 7" Craftsman table saw table.
In his spare time we built wooden boats.
-Zz
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On Sat, 7 Nov 2009 18:53:00 -0500, the infamous "Bill"

What do you do with them? I do NOT buy from Searz, ever.
I have a waffle head for framing, smooth face for finishing, tack hammers, warrington cabinetmaker's hammer, rock hammer, tack hammer, planishing hammer, tiny claw hammer for shoes and stuff, drilling hammers, 5lb sledge, 10lb sledge, various sizes of ball peens, dead blow hammers, Nupla replaceable-face hammers, rubber mallets, wooden mallets, polyurethane carving mallet, brass antispark hammers, brass/wood plane hammers, welder's chipping hammer/brush, stone trimming hammers, & sheetmetal bumping hammers.
And after all that, I normally fasten construction projects with screws and/or lags. ;)

My favorite hammer for screwless construction is the HF waffle-headed 22oz framer. It's the best $3 I've spent in a long time. I had to buy a second one this decade because I missed a nail behind a sharp metal guard and sheared the head halfway off the one I bought in '92 or so. I haven't been affected by poor heat treating. I've seen hammer heads break in two, but I've never seen a chip from a brittle head, nor have I been damaged by one (other than the normal blue fingers/thumbs.) YMMV
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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You only need 1 hammer at a time. It's rare on a project for me to use two hammers in conjunction with each other, and when I do it's usually trying another one because the first wasn't doing the job well.
Still can't use more than 1 at a time, though.
Puckdropper
--
How many hammers must a woodworker own before they call him a woodworker?

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Bill wrote:

I suppose I could get by with half a dozen, although I must have more like fifteen.
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Hammers are like clamps, can't have too many, although you rarely need more than one of each kind. I refuse to count how many I have
Luigi
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On Sat, 7 Nov 2009 21:38:47 -0800 (PST), the infamous Luigi Zanasi

Aw, c'mon, WeeGee! Inquiring minds want to know. Count 'em up!
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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On Sat, 7 Nov 2009 21:38:47 -0800 (PST), Luigi Zanasi

Never need more than one clamp? I'd like to see your glue-ups. ;-)
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Greetings,
Placing tools where I actually use them has worked very well. In some cases, just one size of wrench or nut driver of a set lives on my bandsaw or work bench while the others of the set live in the cabinet or tool box. For hammers, one round mallet lives next to the lathe, another lives next to the bench chisels, claw hammers live next to the boxes of nails so I can get nails and a hammer at the same place.
As for quality, for some kinds of jobs the quality does not matter since any quality will do for the job, e.g. the 5 pound sledge use to gently nudge boards around during clamping for glueing. For other jobs, e.g. framing using lots of nails, you will want quality.
One more thing, the really cheap hammers can crumble during use. The head actually falls apart from metal fatigue. These I would not have around for safety reasons.
Rather than make a list of hammers, try making a list of your jobs that need a hammer. Then decide how many and what kinds of hammers you want for your jobs.
Sincerely, Bill
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On Sat, 7 Nov 2009 22:28:36 -0800 (PST), Bill

Sounds exactly like the decision you make when you stock your everyday general tool pouch. Deciding on what commonly used tools to add to that limited space is sometimes a pain.
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On Sun, 8 Nov 2009 02:31:07 -0500, the infamous "Lee Michaels"

But, whatever you do, do NOT buy a copy of these books. (They are extremely habit-forming. DAMHIKT )
_A Museum of Early American Tools_ by Eric Sloane
_Hand Tools: Their Ways and Workings_ by Aldren A. Watson
_Tools & How to Use Them_ by Albert Jackson
_Tools Rare and Ingenious: Celebrating the World's Most Amazing Tools_ by Sandor Nagyszalanczy (Just call him Sandor. Everyone'll grok it.)
_Classic Hand Tools_ by Garrett Hack, John S Sheldon, and John S. Sheldon
_Japanese Woodworking Tools: Their Tradition, Spirit, and Use_ by Toshio Odate (I just succumbed to this one last week.)
_Dictionary of American Hand Tools: A Pictorial Synopsis_ (Schiffer Book for Collectors) by Alvin Sellens. This one is -especially- the one to avoid. It will give you so many ideas your head'll explode. As sister publication with leatherworking tools is as dangerous. Either one (or Mike Burton's _Make Your Own Woodworking Tools: Metalwork Techniques to Create, Customize, and Sharpen in the Home Workshop_, or anything by Alexander G. Weygers) may lead to metalworking, another dreaded affliction from which we are seldom immune.
Tread carefully, my fellow fr^Hiends.
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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Currently on sale at Lee Valley... Half price, limited stock. I've got mine, so have it!
<http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pP622&cat=1,44047&ap=1>
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On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 11:39:58 -0600, the infamous Dave Balderstone

Yeah, so you said a few days ago. I checked it out in the Amazone when I first saw the title, and I knew that I shouldn't buy it. It might make me break out both crowbars to get to a credit card, and I'd spend my hard earned cash/credit on a tool I'd never use. I collect and use 'users', TYVM.
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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