How do you keep purple heart purple?


Hi, I'm making some varnished rope bins for a sailboat deck out of purple heart and mahogany. The ph looks fabulous when I get it but after I sand out the planing marks and mill it the purple color fades to kind of a dirty gray. What am I doing wrong? Heat from the orbital sander? Is there a way to restore the color? I'm kind of new to this. Thank you for your time.
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Wait. The Purpleheart is not purple inside, it becomes so when exposed to light, so after milling you expose fresh, unpurpled wood. After a few days it should be fine.
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On Mon, 07 Nov 2005 08:14:19 +0100, Juergen Hannappel

Like Juergen said, wait, it'll turn purple again soon. However, on some purpleheart, the colour might fade after a few years. No way of telling which kind you got, as far as I know.
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My understanding is that UV light causes it to turn brown. Sanding it will turn it back to purple. I have used exterior finish with UV inhibitors to keep it purple. max

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Hmm, conflicting responses here. The only living example of purple heart I saw was on a boat deck. It had turned a dirty grey brown after being on deck unvarnished about 3 years, which would seem to support your idea. It was very sturdy. I may try buffing it back to a brilliant luster. Thanks.

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Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869

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The purple will come with sunlight. I put small turnings in the cupholder in the armrest of my truck and the colour is back in a day. To keep the colour, I have read about using Armoural since the UV blockers in this are supposed to help. I have just tried this recently so I do not have any long term results yet. Brad Harding hardingpens.com
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220grit said:

Reenlist!
Sorry, couldn't help myself...
You already know the answer, grasshopper - patience! Oxygen, possibly light exposure, and time.
Greg G.
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10,000 men, she screwed that day,.. but only one, won the green baret,.. weeeee,...
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As I remember from the same discussion several years ago, purple heart is a common name for about 6 different trees. The response of the wood may depend on the particular tree the wood came from.
You can look at a stack of purple heart and see at least a couple different color tones in the different boards. I once made the mistake of buying a plank then going back to get another and ended up with two different purple hearts. The jewelry box never did look right.
I've had a plank in the garage near the door for several years. It has kept its color. When I cut it it turned brown but within a week it was back to a nice color again for finishing of the jewelry boxes.
220grit wrote:

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