Help fix damaged truss rod end

Hello:
When bulding my workbench (truss rod construstion), I made the mistake of tapping the stubborn truss rod ends with a hammer to move them in place. As a result, the threads on the ends were smashed and will not accept a nut. I tried to use a triangular file to "recreate" the grooves, but this only made it stripped! Is there any way for me to repair the ends or rethread them? I know this is not rec.metalworking, but I figured someone here has done the same thing. Please list multiple solutions if there are any. Thanks in advance!
Bob
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They make a thread restoring file you could try or you can possibly clean up the threads by running a die over them.
Describe the rod you are using for a truss.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

1. Get a die and re-cut them... 2. If you've not torn them up too badly, file off enough to get past the bad portion and go on.. 3. Thread-cutting file... 4. Variations on above...
As a "trick", next time you need to do such an "adjustment", thread a nut on the bolt/rod first and use either a wood block or a soft-face mallet to drive...
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It's steel. Re-thread the end with a thread chaser or a thread restoration file. Worst case, have it cut, weld a new section on.
Dave

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Try tapering the end of the rod. I've done that in similar situations with success.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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On 17 Jan 2005 08:18:08 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

rethreading file.
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If you have access to a tap & die set, you can 'chase' the threads back into their original condition (or so) with the appropriatly sized die-- to find out the size, you can use the supplied nut & test - by hand & gently with various sized taps until the correct one will easily screw on to the tap. You may have to round over the peened end of the rod slightly with a file. Most dies have an end that is larger than the finished thread size. Screw that end on first. If you don't have a die set, any decent machine shop can rethread the end for you on the lathe. Hope this helps.
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"Phil at small (vs at large)" wrote:

Don't think they would have a die? :)
By the time he pays the machine setup fee, he'll have bought the rod several times over...
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Thought of that after I posted-- and you were so kind to remind me. I always think most people have more bucks than me lol-- Anyway, I like the post below yours best-- simple simple simple.
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"Phil at small (vs at large)" wrote:

As long as there is enough extra length to implement it, of course... :)
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Or the start of a nice little die/tap set--always good to have around. Dan
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If possible cut 1/8 in or so off the end with a hacksaw then file the end or go the hardware store and get a threading die and run that down the threads. Good luck Russ

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On 17 Jan 2005 08:18:08 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Simplest way is to file or grind the end that is damaged flat until the damaged area is cleaned up. Forget about "triangular files" they are generally the wrong pitch angle anyway. You could always remove the rod and start a die nut of the appropriate size from the opposite end and run it the entire lenght of the rod but you will likely still be faced with grinding/filing the damaged end done because the die nut won't cut new thred in rod that is grossly swelled oversize.
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