Hand Saws


I have started using the around twenty dollars Japanese pull saws. I find they are easy to keep on a line and a whole lot less muscle power. Does anyone else use these as opposed to the push saws?
Don
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use both. The Japanese saws are great, I think. It's just a question of a different way of maintaining how it is held and balanced for a straight kerf. I adapted right to it without a mental sweat. First I bought the mini Shark ryoba, then the Vaughan "Bear" ryoba, which is full sized with a narrower width than the full sized Shark and more $. I am really impressed with the quality of cut. They are for fine work, and for use in finer ways of doing the more major work.
But I do not use them "as opposed to" the Disston D-23! Also a masterwork.
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use the Japanese saws and other types, but the Japanese types really shine for cutting kerfs in material to go on the lathe. Less bounce to the ounce when starting the cut, so it's faster and neater--at least for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They [Japanese Saws] have become my preferred tool. They have to be operated with a little care. Don't loan them out to Ignoranuses, they will rip some teeth off. There is a little learning curve to keep them sharp. Make sure you get a feather edge file to touch them up. Very nice to work with. Bugs
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 23:44:25 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, Don

The Japan Woodworker has a razor saw for $26 delivered which has become my favorite saw, and I have a stable of old Disstons and Adkins, a LV dovie, and a few others. Hell, I even use it to hack up tuba fores. They don't tire you like a push saw will, either.
Look for JWW's ad in the back of most FWW mags.
-- Like they say, 99% of lawyers give the rest a bad name. ------------------------------------------------------ http://diversify.com Lawyer-free Website Development
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don wrote:

I teach a short class on handcut dovetails a few times a year. I always bring an assortment of Western and Japanese style saws and let the students try out both. The students seem to strongly prefer one or the other, and in the classes I've taught there seems to be a slight preference for the Western saw. However, I've seen equally good joints cut with either one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interesting, which is your favorite western dovetail saw?
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AAvK wrote:

My favorite is a Groves and Sons 8" tapered backsaw with an open grip handle, obtained from Ebay and resharpened. I have several; Disston, Jackson, Atkins, etc. I also have a couple of modern saws; a gents style saw with the set pressed out and resharpened by Two Cherries (mostly just so students can try the round handle), and a modern LN Independence backsaw. I paid a fair sum for the Independence saw but I just plain don't like it as well as the Groves. The LN does cut a bit smoother but is harder to start and does not cut nearly as fast.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.