Gun Checkering

Page 1 of 3  
I've ordered a CZ Lux bolt action .22 http://www.cz-usa.com/product_detail.php?id=3 for my eleven year old for Christmas.
The specs and the reportage on this piece are excellent but it has one funny elision. It is checkered on the grip but not on the forearm.
Well, you know, that just won't do.
I think that I have a decent read on how to go about this with the carving tools that I have in hand but - I'm not a gunsmith. Does this way madness lie?
I figured to lay it out and cut to the bevel on the layout lines - but what do I know?
Do you guys have a clue as to how this is usually done?
tom
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
T,
An 8 year old recently shot his father and his room mate to death here in AZ. Please keep it locked up.
I'd hate to lose one of the guys I love to hate. ;-)
cm = gun owner

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 9 Dec 2008 00:51:12 +0000, Tom Watson wrote

which looks absolutely correct to me unless it's bespoke to a single user's exact arm measurement when there'll be less variation in forearm positioning for the next _n_ years. (nice looking piece, btw)
DNFWI.
What do I know? I live in a country where they don't even allow guns to be kept locked up in gun club ranges anymore..

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Generally a checkering cutter, held in a checkering tool handle is used for this work. Various cutters are made for different lines per inch and coarseness and for cutting single or multiple rows at one time. I suggest matching the lines per inch and general checkering style on the grip least you end up with something less attractive than you started with... The tools are cheap, it's the skill that's expensive. ;~)
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p &279&title=S-1%20CHECKERING%20TOOL http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?pV94&title=NO.%201%20SINGLE%20LINE%20REPLACEMENT%20CUTTER http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/catsearch.aspx?k=checkering%20cutter&ps &si=True
They've got a basic book too... http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?pW09&title=FUNDAMENTALS%20OF%20GUNSTOCK%20CHECKERING
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Grossbohlin wrote:

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p &279&title=S-1%20CHECKERING%20TOOL

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?pV94&title=NO.%201%20SINGLE%20LINE%20REPLACEMENT%20CUTTER

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/catsearch.aspx?k=checkering%20cutter&ps &si=True

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?pW09&title=FUNDAMENTALS%20OF%20GUNSTOCK%20CHECKERING

Practice on scrap first, second and third. Then take a deep breath and repeat until confident in what you are doing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Generally I'm pretty okay on doing firearm metal work for myself but never had any luck with woods especially checkering. I completed a few handgun grips that were alright for me but would never sell such a job to any individual, besides they were inexpensive grips from a guys catch-all box I bought at a show. The problem I see here, even for a pro is getting your checking to match identically to the checking done on the grip. Personally speaking that particular firearm mentioned in the OP is an excellent piece, I've owned CZ products for years and hold their long guns in high regard however if I wanted the forearm checkered and planned on using a gold-ring scope (aging eyes) I would upgrade to the American model 452. I've seen some of CZ's work and on that Turkish walnut their checking is excellent and not to be confused with a production run job that resembles a cheese grater.
Ray,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 9 Dec 2008 04:55:16 -0800 (PST), "R.M.R"

A general query here: does the company make *any* models with a checkered forearm? If so, would it be kosher to call the company and, well you know, see if you can get *them* to do it? Heh...
cg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charlie Groh wrote:#A general query here: does the company make *any* models with a checkered forearm? #If so, would it be kosher to call the company and, well you know, see if you can get *them* to do it?
~~~~~ Yes sir they do but I'm inclined to believe it would be a substantial fee almost as close as getting what they call The American model, but they are a good group that have a reputation for excellent PR so who knows. Maybe they are in the holiday spirit frame of mind... Ray,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nice looking gun Tom. Although the stock looks like walnut, did you notice that the stock is Beachwood? You will likely have to also match the stain, something to consider.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just about the age when I was allowed to buy my first .22 rifle, a Mossberg bolt action. I eventually refinished the stock with a hand rubbed oil finish that came out beautifully; didn't attempt checkering, though bought a checkering tool and was working up the nerve to attempt it. Ended up employed as a research engineer for Winchester for 26 years starting in 1964 (the year of the production press checkering). During my initial orientation I got to spend a day with Nick Kusmit one of the last of the Winchester Custom Shop engravers (and an exceptional person). During the late 1960's, early 1970's one of my co-workers collaborated on the development of a production cut checkering process sufficiently economical to finally eliminate the press checkering, to the considerable relief to all who appreciated fine firearms.
John G has given you the keys to the mechanics of the process. It's not magic. My advice is that checkering should be approached with love and patience (and a well planned and tasteful paper pattern). I'd suggest first presenting your fine gift to your son as its makers crafted it. After a period of ownership that concentrates on the appreciation of fine wood/metal craftsmanship, safe gun handling and the pure joy of sport shooting, then see if the boy feels any desire to checker or otherwise customize it. Be guided by his desires.
A little light reading: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=gun+checkering&aq=f&oq David Merrill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In reference to David Merrill response:
~~~~~ That was an extremely enjoyable post and throughout the firearm community the name, Nick Kusmit is considered the master of engraving and his brother John was also top quality. You don't have to like firearms to be bewildered by the work some of these masters have done on metal. I can stand and look at them for hours, not mere firearms but beautiful works of art and Mr. Kusmit was one of the best. I can only imagine actually meeting him. Well maybe in another world. Thanks for sharing you experience, Those type of stories from people like you I can hear for days. It was well appreciated... Ray,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got a couple of CZ Ringneck model SxS shotguns. They were reasonably priced and they handle nicely... That said, I'm a fan of their guns and personally find the Lux attractive. I second David's suggestion to let him use the gun as-is for now.
BTW, I took a look around the CZ site and noticed they have added models to their .22 line up... I think I just found my next gun. ;~)
RE engravers, I had the opportunity to meet and spend some time with Lynton McKenzie when I worked in Colonial Williamsburg's Gunsmith Shop. Absolutely amazing work that makes my empire dovetails look like child's play. ;~) The closest I ever got to Kusmit is photos in books and magazines... more amazing work!
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Several respondents would probably enjoy this:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Winchester+muerrle&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&oq As well as this: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
David Merrill

Lynton
Absolutely
The
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to everyone for their responses..
I'm going to go with the idea of seeing how the boy shoots with it and then think about monkeying with the gingerbread.
tom
wrote:

Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Watson wrote:

Tom , Looking at the picture of that firearm ,it has the traditional European Schnabel fore end/arm .I'm pretty certain that checkering was not done on this type of fore end/arm. Nice rifle BTW ,I have a Brno Model 2 ,which IIRC is the previous name or owner of CZ . I've had it for many years and is a great little rifle and very accurate with the right ammunition fed to it.
Your son is a very lucky fellow, that his Dad would buy him such a rifle , that he lives in a country where firearm owner ship is viewed as not politically correct.
--
Kevin (Bluey)
"I'm not young enough to know everything."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
T,
I grew up in Michigan and we had 22's and pellet guns from the time we were 12. We could walk to the woods and do our shooting/hunting. There were also several places we could walk or bike to fish. What a great place to grow up. I called one of my childhood friends today to chat about the old days. Never worried about locking the guns up back then, no stranger danger either. Hell I was so brave I drank water right from the garden hose!!!! Your son is a lucky kid. Enjoy your kids as the time zips by.
Be safe,
cm

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 08 Dec 2008 19:51:12 -0500, Tom Watson wrote:

Very clever. Buying a child a lethal weapon. Why not give him the keys to your car and tell him to go for a drive through town while you're at it.
--
Liverpool. European City Of Culture 2008
http://www.liverpool08.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With sufficient training and appropriate supervision, I'm sure an 11 year old could, safely. Which was rather the point elsewhere.
I keep a box of bandaids in the shop for visitors who, almost without exception, eventually grab a carving gouge off the bench to take a test cut or two. Adults need close supervision also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

At what age to you guys over there "grow up" enough to handle a weapon?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

According to their nanny government: never.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.