Grumpy: TS Still Burning

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Thanks Bob and Bruce.
The email address is good, I filter it for spam, so just use a subject like 'tablesaw'.
I had discovered these threads earlier. I took the bolts out and added lock washers based on your suggestion. Has anybody got a torque value. I don't want to strip the threads or break a bolt. On the other hand, I had the blade adjusted to .0001 a week ago, and it 'lost' the adjustment over about 30 cuts, so I want them to be tight enough so it doesn't happen again.
Sure would be nice to make this adjustment in 15minutes. I spent about 5 hours last night. The problem was that I'd get the adjustment bang-on, then when I tightened up the trunnion bolts, the adjustment would be all-wrong again.
My 'discoveries':
1. I clamped the trunnions to the tabletop. This way, when the bolts are loosened up, the assembly stays 'put', and the after-tightening alignment is alot closer to what I started with.
2. I found that the front trunnion bolt on the right-hand side (facing the saw) had the most detrimental effect on the alignment when doing final tightening. I tightened this bolt to full torque first, then made any corrections, then tightened up the other bolts.
Using these two 'tricks', I was able to get the blade to within .002"
Cuts on the crosscut sled are pretty much burn-free now. Should I be happy and call it quits and just pray it 'stays put'?
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Grumpy,
I just sent you the two postings I spoke of earlier. Main points:
1. Turn that tablesaw over and remove the undercarriage. It's a one time job that will save you grief later on. Clean, lube and adjust. Couple of drift pins to remove - one on each wheel for blade height and bevel. With the TS upside down, you can remove everything, inspect, de-burr and replace the bolts in 30 min.
2. Be sure the flats that mate with the lands on the tabletop for the trunnions are flat (no burr's). Use a small mill bastard file to touch them up.
3. Replace the two front trunnion bolts using threaded rod and couplers as I explained in the follow-up post. Makes adjusting everything so much easier.
4. When all the burrs or other defects on the lands are fixed, the new bolts and couplers are installed and evrything is cleaned, and lubed - assemble everything so its just snug - don't bolt anything down tight. Flip the TS back over.
5. Now align the tie-bars for parallel as mentioned in the procedure. Trunnion bolts only need to be snug while aligning the tie bars. The big lock nuts on the tie-bars (Nyloks) are about 1-1/2" dia as I recall (and you will need to use a strong-arm bar to break them loose. When you tighten them - do not jerk on the bar - just snug each one up evenly and smoothly. There is no torque setting but you'll know when tight is tight. The tie-bars must be parallel or the blade adjustment will never be correct when you use the blade for a bevel cut. I ended up with a 10" sanding disk from Sears to use as the flat plate. Remove any sandpaper and clean any residue off with mineral spirits.
6. With the tie-bars adjusted, back off on the trunnion bolts slightly so that the whole top can be moved easily. Now do the blade alignment procedures.
7. You can now easily loosen and tighten the front trunnion bolts (due to the modified bolts in front) and move the undercarriage around easily. Just snug the bolts so it doen't move to easily. If it doesn't stay in one spot now after you do the final tightening (1 turn before they break), then you have a problem with either a trunnion block or a land on the TS top. There are only 4 points of contact where the trunnions mate with the top so it shouldn't be too hard to find the culprit. You may need to add a shim or file a land down a touch if there are not all the same height.
I'm making this sound more difficult than it really is. Just use your parts breakdown to see how everything comes apart, keep your cool and you do not need to tighten those trunnion bolts so tight that they'll never move again - just good and snug. Ever tighten the adjutment bolt on an alternator after replacing a belt - about that tight. Use a 6" box-end wrench to tighten them - not a 1/2 drive ratchett wrench and you should be alright. But if you do break one - start with my first post and read from the top..........;-)
Bob S.
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Thanks, Bob, lot's of detail, I appreciate it. It sounds like alot of work, but worth it if you can get an adjustment done in 15 minutes that stays in place longer than a week :-)
Steve
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