Grizzly or Delta unisaw

Im looking at buying a Grizzly 1023s unisaw but a friend of mine at work mentioned that I should re-think my purchase because of the bearings used throughout the internal components. He mentioned that Delta uses more smaller bearings which in turn will make the tool last longer. The better the bearings the smoother the arbor etc. Does anyone out there own a Grizzly, I know the Delta unisaw is an amazing tool, but its $700 more
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am biased because I own 2 unisaws, one made in 1939. That said, you have to look at the entire picture. Compare one to the other. Include features, options, availablity of parts, quality, motor, personal preference,cost, and future resale. I would "suspect" the bearings on the grizzley could be replaced in the future. You have to write the check, but maybe these thoughts will help you decide.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

============================Pretty good advice ...
While I run a Jet Cabinet Saw, and not a Griz or the Unisaw I kind of suspect that the "life" of all three most likely is loinger then my own life...Especially since none of them will be would be overly abused nor run for more than a few hours every day...as a comercial saw in a comercial shop may be...
Bob Griffiths
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree. You are the one who is shelling out on this one so do so with the facts. Currently I own a Jet saw with the extension table I think it is an awesome saw. But prior to buying this I read through all the feedback from others and they always had great things to say about the Grizzly saws. They would always mention that they were best in price class and comp to the Jet and Unisaw. But all the feedback still doesn't pay for the saw. I ended up with mine amazingly cheap and brand new so that was how I made my buying decision. I paid less than the Grizzly. Good luck, Kevin

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am no engeneer but did your friend explain how smaller bearings equate to longer life? It has been my experience that larger bearings tend to last longer. Perhaps a better quality bearing will last longer than a lessor quality bearing but I would find it hare to swallow that smaller bearing last longer than larger bearings.
The better

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

He did say there are more smaller bearings. If there are two small bearings on the end of a shaft it's quite possible they would be stronger and last longer than one large bearing. Actually it's more than likely.
On getting replacement bearings, pull your bearing and go to your local bearing distributor. The only time I left without what I needed was when they didn't have enough of what was needed (8 idlers on a band saw, they only had 6). I have yet to see a proprietary bearing. There is a caveat but out of this forums context.
On bearing quality, Many times there will be more than one bearing with the same dimensions/ suitable for the use but one will have substantially more balls/ rollers/ pins. The more rollers the less load each carries (duh?).
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The larger the bearing, the more load it can handle. However - - - The larger the diameter, the more travel each ball or roller will make on a single revolution.
I have two cars that will turn 2,000 RPM at 70 mph. I drive a lot at that speed every years. I had a rental car that I liked, but at the same speed, the engine was turning 2500 rpm. After driving it a while I decided I'd not buy one for myself. Why? I keep cars well over the 100,000 mile mark. Given that I may drive it 100,000 miles at 70 mph, the crankshaft will have turned 43,103,000 times more than my present car. Lots of wear on them bearings.
So, if bearing "X" is 3" diameter it will have a ball travel of 9.42 inches while a 2" bearing will travel 6.28 inches. At 4,000 rpm, the larger bearing will cover 3142 feet while there smaller bearing will have gone 2094 feet. Given proper loading, I'd say the smaller would last longer purely from a friction point. That would also mean proper operating temperatures and lubrication.
OK, who knows for sure? Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

AAhhhhttt... Crank bearings are totally different than roller bearings. They are more like split 2 piece bushings. The larger CS bearings will distribute the wear and load over a larger surface. CS bearings do not spin unless you have just blown the engine.. ;~) Good thinkig on the wear factor of the higher RPM motor though.

AAhhhttt... Ball bearing balls and needle bearing needles don't circle the bearing at a 1 to 1 ratio. The larger those balls are, the fewer times thay will turn around the inner race. If the inner race is 1/2" in diameter, and the outer race is 2" the balls are about 3/4" in diameter. For each revolution of the inner race which is about 1.5" in circumference, the ball that is about 2.3" in circumference will only turn .65 times for each revolution of the inner race. For a larger bearing with the same size 1/2" inner race and an outer race that is 3" in diameter, the balls are about 1.25" in diameter and 3.93" in circumference and those balls will turn about .38 times for each revolution of the inner race. So, regardless of the bearing size, the inner race that the arbor is supported by will always be the same size and turn the same speed given the arbor is the same size and turns the same speed. The larger the outside race of the bearing the larger the balls will be and the slower thay will turn.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, I did not consider that. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, that was an example,,, I was using extremes as I have never seen roller balls in bearings as large as I described when the inner race is 1/2" in diameter... ;~) Race thickness would also dictate ball diameters also...
wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

But then the engine turning 2,500 rpm is only carrying 4/5 the load, all other things being equal.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the Grizzly 1023z. No problems, have used the Delta unisaw and the Jet and find the Grizzly compares well with both, each have strength and weaknesses. On Grizzly tools I have had bearing problems (Have had similar bearing problems on Delta and Jet products also) The Griz bearings were mostly off shelf bearings that could be picked up at NAPA and were easy to replace, One exception was a bearing that had to be specially ordered. All of the Jet and Delta bearings were special order items. In all but one case, with all brands the tools that had bearing failure were tools that had been used harder then they were designed to be used. In retrospect I would go with the Grizzly tools in respect to bearings, they are easier to replace and hold up as well or better the Delta and Jet tools I have used. If cost were not a factor I would buy the Jet saw first, the Grizzly second and the Delta third, for the cost it would be the Grizzly first by a wide margin. Total number of Grizzly bearings replaced in last 5 years 2 number of Delta bearings replaced in last 5 years 4 number of Jet bearings replaced in last 5 years 1 all on sanders and drill presses, not all of them mine by the way, and all tools used on a daily basis.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I just bought the "retail version" of the Grizzly, the Shopfox saw with the classic fence ( the "B" clone") . And while I have only used it a few times before engaging it to complete my set of custom quartersawn white oak mission style kitchen cabinets, I am happy with it so far.
--
Dennis Slabaugh, Hobbyist Woodworker
www.woodworkinghobby.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm also thinking about buying the Shop Fox TS. Who did you buy if from? Mail-order or store. If mail-order, any comments on the shipping? I've heard many horror stories about damage in freight shipping, mainly from Grizzly customers but, at least, Grizzly seem to respond quickly and make it right. I'm on a budget and been saving for a loooooooong time for my dream TS. Will I be happy with the Shop Fox?
Thanks
message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You want a shipping horror story? OK here you go. Ordered the Griz 1023zx, took 2 weeks to get it in, When delivered the saw was on its side and funny little cast iron things were rattling around the box, I called Griz and they sent another one out a week later and got the broken one. New saw had broken box with parts spilling out of it, some were big cast iron things that looked like broken table tops, I refused it and sent both back to Griz. Called Griz and told them what I had done. Griz got all upset (woman worker) no more 1023zx in stock, sent me a 1023z by different carrier, discounted saw , refunded difference. week latter got new saw, took 45 min to get the shrink wrap off the thing so that I could get it off the pallet and unpack it, saw it mint condition. Year latter ordered new 1023z took two weeks to get it, better packing job, new carrier, saw arrived in mint condition. Both saws working fine and seem happy in their new homes.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Got a 1023 seven years ago and use it pretty much daily. Great machine. ploughs through whatever I give it, stays true and never seems to need anything done to it. I clean and wax the top occasionally. Save the $700 I say. Good luck with decision Casey. Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You may want to call Grizzly and ask if the saw is 'in stock' before you order. Hope this helps. Joe

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.