Glue recommendation


I have been asked to make a cane for an elderly friend. I intend to use some wood scrounged from pallets that came from Brazil. The stuff is pink, finely grained and downright stubborn about surrendering nails! It's tough ... I never break it, but I often pull the nail heads right through the planks nailed to it.
I just wish I knew what its name is.
However, that's not the point of this posting. What I am really bugging you guys for is some glue advice.
I plan to make this cane by ripping 4 pieces lengthwise, gluing them to best show the grain and then turning it on my lathe.
This is not an oily wood. What sort of adhesive do you recommend?
I am leaning toward either a polyurethane, rubberized superglue or 30 minute epoxy.
What say you?
Bill
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'd use Elmer's Woodworker's Glue. Clamp it up for 72 hours.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, Jan 28, 2006, 8:40pm snipped-for-privacy@replyonlist.com (W Canaday) could only come up with: <snip> What say you?
I've been having very good results using wood glue for gluing wood.
JOAT You only need two tools: WD-40, and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the tape.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"J T" wrote in message

Yabbut you gotta be careful, some only works if your name is Elmer.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/13/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 28 Jan 2006 22:37:42 -0500, J T wrote:

Thank you for sharing.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've been having very good results using wood glue for gluing wood.
Why not "maple syrup"?
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sun, Jan 29, 2006, 11:39am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@notquite.net (AAvK) doth want to know: Why not "maple syrup"?
I think that only works on maple wood.
JOAT You only need two tools: WD-40, and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the tape.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
W Canaday wrote:

Resorcinol glue come as two part--one is powder (the catalyst) and the other is liquid. It's water proof and its deep purple should work perfect with you pink wood which will darken with finish. Elmers Waterproof or any name brand resorcinol glue. I'm still using out of my purchase in 1972. Last thing I used it on was a ceramic rabbit with a broken ear. Ceramic rabbit is still fine after 3 years of water, rain, snow, freezing temperature, sunlight and 100 degree heat.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pink wood? Lyptus comes to mind. It is plantation grown, pinkish, very hard and dense. It does tend to burn a bit while cutting, is kind of splitery, but does glue nicely. I use titebond 2. robo hippy
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree with JT.
Regular wood glue will be more than adequate.
cm

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just a guess but the pink, finely grained timber you mentioned could well be Meranti, fits the same description!
Jon www.woodworkersuk.co.uk - Wooden gates and garage doors handcrafted to your own sizes!

pink,
tough
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.