Glue

I need to get a new supply of yellow glue. I have been using Elmer's yellow glue for last two years that I bought in local HD. I have not complains for it but I have little woodworking experience and didn't use other glues. I am considering Elmer's, Titlebond II and Titlebond III. Elmer's is by far cheaper then Titlebond II which is 50% cheaper then Titlebond III. Are Titlebond II and III worth extra money? My workshop is in heated basement so I am gluing at ideal temperature and humidity.
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Mon, Jan 24, 2005, 12:44pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@audible.com (Sasha) claims: I need to get a new supply of yellow glue. <snip>
Does the Elmers do every thing you want it to do? If it does, then I don't see any real reason to change from it.
Any of the glues would work for me, but I prefer Titebond II. Different glues do have different set times, but any of them are stronger than the wood itself. Buy the smallest amount you can get of each, and compare them, then when you run out, buy the one you prefer. Your money, your choice.
JOAT Some is good, more is better, too much is just enough. - Unknown
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I haven't tried TBIII, but the glue Garrett-Wade sells is better than TBII.
Still, I will be trying TBIII when I next buy glue.
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It all depends upon the use to which it is put.
If you do not want water resistant glue, it is better than Titebond.
If you want water resistant glue, Titebond II and III are better.
If you want water proof glue, use 2 part epoxy.
If you have a really complex assembly, use Titebond Extend or Titebond 2 Extend, as they are about the same a Elmer's and have a long open time so you can fit the components (maybe an extra 10 minutes).
If you want a really solid edge to end bond, try Probond Interior/Exterior.
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PDQ --
| I need to get a new supply of yellow glue. I have been using Elmer's | yellow glue for last two years that I bought in local HD. I have not | complains for it but I have little woodworking experience and didn't | use other glues. I am considering Elmer's, Titlebond II and Titlebond | III. Elmer's is by far cheaper then Titlebond II which is 50% cheaper | then Titlebond III. Are Titlebond II and III worth extra money? My | workshop is in heated basement so I am gluing at ideal temperature and | humidity. |
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Elmer's also makes a yellow glue called ProBond. This glue is a dryer glue and tends to set up much more quickly. I prefer the bottle that the ProBond comes in to any other glue bottle.
That said I prefer TBII for typical use and refill the ProBond bottle with the TBII. I have just about finished off a case of TBIII that I was sent to evaluate. It is a good glue, is beige in color, and dries to a light brown. It appears to be water proof as it is advertised. I let a glue brush coated in TBIII dry in the bottom of a plastic cup. The bristles pulled out of the brush when dry and they have remained there. The cup almost always has water in it.
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Dunno. If you want a good glue at a decent price, try LocTite's WoodWorx glues at Wal*Mart
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I prefer Tilebond II to its Elmer alternatives. TBII has a quicker tack and I like that. What really sold me is the dispenser TB products comes with. Tilebond comes with a pull-to-open/push-to-close cover. The Elmer et. al. bottle has a little cap that comes off completely and I invariably winds up on the floor lost among the sawdust.
I have tried TBIII and I don't like it. TBIII dries to a grey color and, in my opinion, is much more difficult to clean up.

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On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 00:49:48 GMT, "Jim Giblin"

I prefer Elmer's for its bottle. (As far as I can tell, the glues themselves are interchangeable.) I find that the TB cap is forever getting clogged and I have to take it off and take it apart and clean it out. The Elmer's cap, OTOH, never clogs and I only occasionally drop it. I'm pretty sure that over the course of a year I spend less time crawling around looking for the Elmer's cap that I occasionally drop than I spend cleaning out the damn TB cap.
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Wed, Jan 26, 2005, 9:11pm snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (JohnCarlson) claims: <snip> I find that the TB cap is forever getting clogged and I have to take it off and take it apart and clean it out. <snip>
Huh, Titebond II is all I use, and the top has never clogged with me. I do shut the top if I'm not using it for several minutes. However, I have had it glue itself shut the next day with a layer of glue, but when that happens, I just pop the dried glue off, and it's set to go. I prefer the Titebond top.
JOAT Some is good, more is better, too much is just enough. - Unknown
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Frank Klausz swears by plain Elmer's white glue. I remember we used it for a breadboard in high school wood shop, and it held up for many years and washings (I think it got lost rather than broken). Haven't got around to trying it myself, but I trust his opinion.
You should throw away your glue after 6 months or a year (he says, though I'm still using up powdered Cascamite from 20 years ago. It's a bit chunky.)
Regards, Allen
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Allen Windhorn (507) 345-2782 FAX (507) 345-2805
Kato Engineering (Though I do not speak for Kato)
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