Full kerf or thin kerf

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Hey who uses a dado to make rips and cross cuts? "~)
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wrote in message

If you're really after saving $$ on wood by using a thin kerf, then you should really take the next step and use a bandsaw.
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That's for sissies. Really frugal man would split the wood with his pen knife and have no waste.
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wrote in message

You still have the waste from finishing the edge. If you're really trying to conserve wood, have it laser cut.
Puckdropper
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wrote in message

And if he were really frugal, he would have turned down that pen knife on his lathe from scraps.
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wrote in message

The lathe that he also built from scraps: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
- Owen -
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Thanks for the pointer. Been meaning to buy these books for years. Bought both the lathe and milling machine book.

(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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charlie b wrote:

????? Where do you live that finding a 2x4 is an "adventure"?

Ply, no, MDF, yes. And some projects use two pieces of ply bonded together--with those it's easier to rough cut, bond, and finish cut than to cut two identical pieces.

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--John
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J. Clarke wrote:

????? Where do you live that finding a 2x4 is an "adventure"?
I'm not talking about doug fir if you're west of the Mississipi or Lodge Pole Pine or southern yellow pine.
Around here, finding 2x2s - in maple, or mahogany or ash, or even oak, let alone padouk or teak - IS an adventure. There are places you can order it - sight unseen - and wait three or four months for a container to arrive from god knows where to actually have it in hand. I don't plan that far ahead - though I do pick up stuff I don't "need" right now - if the opportunity presents itself. 10/4 and 12/4 claro walnut slabs - some of it crotch - for $40 to $50 apiece is something I can't pass up. A Bartlett Pear log - en buole for $200 now sits under a loose tarp on my driveway - off the ground on stickers of course.
Now redwood - we got shitloads of the stuff here in NorCal. some of it is absolutely gorgeous - but soft. Pity - some of it has figure which will take your breath away.
Nice to know an arborist who is also a sawyer AND a furniture maker. Once again - Thank You Blair!
charlie b
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charlie b wrote:

How about Sitka spruce?

Just the fact that you refer to it as a 2x2 tells me that you really need to find a hardwood lumber yard. 8/4 maple, mahogany, and oak are quite common.

Now that is something that is virtually unobtainable here. Ipe we got out the ying-yang, but redwood . . .

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wrote:

I prefer a full kerf. I've never tried a thin kerf Forrest but with Frued or Amana I find the thin kerf to have too much flex to suit me. Your mileage may vary.
Mike O.
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Exactly my experience.
FWIW, I have a 3HP cabinet saw to power is not a limiting factor.
-Steve
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Actually when I had a 1 hp Craftsman I always used a thin kerf until I discovered the better quality regular kerf blades. I got better results with a better quality regular kerf blade than I did with think kerf blades on that saw.
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It all depends on the type of woodworking your friend wants to do. Cutting thinner material will be fine with a blade that can flex a bit (although not ideal, it still works). So if all he's buying is stuff from HD or Lowes, he's probably ok with the Thin Kerf. If he wants to cut stuff thicker, I'd recommend the full kerf. The saw he's buying is the same I've got and it'll drive a full kerf just fine. Other than saving a very small amount of wood, there's no reason to go with the thin kerf that I can see. Cheers, cc
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