Found A Use For Pill Bottles

I've been accumulating pill bottles over time, and they're a neat item, too neat to just toss, but couldn't figure out what to use them for. Too small to use for screws, etc. So just been stashing them. Then this evening it struck me. Their tops seal, so they'd be great for mixing up thinned latex for my stain experimenting. .Turns out that when they're shook hard, with some liquid inside, they do leak just the least bet, easily wiped off, and just right for mixing small amounts. Won't have a lot of use for too many of them, but it's a start. Beats mixing in a small cup or something, and with the cap should keep for a few days at least.
JOAT If you can read this you're in range.
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On Dec 30, 7:40�am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

I use them to store wood dust. Every time I mill a new species of wood I collect the shavings/dust and save a small bottle full to mix with glue and use as filler if/when/as required.
FoggyTown
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(J T) wrote:

I use them to store wood dust. Every time I mill a new species of wood I collect the shavings/dust and save a small bottle full to mix with glue and use as filler if/when/as required.
Wife gets some that are tall enough to use, with cardboard dividers, for scrollsaw blades and Yankee bits.
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If you take about 1/2 dozon of them and cut the top 1/2 off, glue the bottoms to a piece of cardboard, you will have a great place to put small objects in while you are working on/repairing things. I used to always look for a place to put screws when I had to repair somthing that had alot of little parts. This works great. Lou
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Sun, Dec 30, 2007, 8:25am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Lou) doth sayeth: If you take about 1/2 dozon of them and cut the top 1/2 off, glue the bottoms to a piece of cardboard, you will have a great place to put small objects in while you are working on/repairing things. I used to always look for a place to put screws when I had to repair somthing that had alot of little parts. This works great.
I prefer the small magnetic pans. Or even just a speaker magnet. I like the pans bes, in case you have screws that aren't attracted to magnets.
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Me, too..lol Glad I read your post before repeating what you said..
I used to use the zip lock bags from pen kits, but pill bottles are less awkward and stack well..
mac
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(J T) wrote:

I use the pill bottles and also, I find that the plastic peanut butter jars a great for storing larger items.
I have 8 Freud forstner bits in one. The don't rust and I can see whets in the jar.
I can match the proper plug cutter and drill bit for making screw hole plugs in the large pill bottles. I have a shield on the cutting edges of the drill bits.
The young bucks in this crowd probably don't know about accumulating pill bottles though. :-)
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*snip*

Well, I guess they're the alternative to the 35MM film canisters. With all the digital cameras out there, the really young folk aren't even gonna know what those are!
Puckdropper
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dc03:

You can go to one of the larger camera stores and they usually have empty ones for the taking - free. Good iteas.
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I have amassed a large quantity of Crystal Light containers that hold the powdered base for my sugar free Margarita's...
Needless to say, I have quite a few at my disposal....
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
in

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Mac,
I use the smaller pill bottles to hold all of my pen busing sets; one set per bottle. I try to use the ones with plain white tops, This way I can label on top what they are and store them in the drawer by my lathe.
Joe aka 10x
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They also hot glue very well, which lets you make connected "sets" of bottles for similar items. Glue a small bottle, slightly offset from centered between two larger ones, so the caps don't touch each other. I turned the small bottles upside down to make "feet" for the assembly, left the tops on, and a press-on rubber pad to keep it from sliding around easily.
Pop`
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Same here; I use quite a few of them. Careful, some paints will soften the plastics I've discovered the hard way<g>. Especially ones with anything like xylene in them.
-- Small parts storage while working on something with lots of parts -- Never thought of your use; but will in future. -- oddball, small items like # 4, 6, 8 & 10 nuts & bolts, staples, low-quantity stuff I only have a couple of but can never find in a tin or drawer, things like that. Then I hot glue whatever's in a bottle to the outside for identification. -- Mixing stains for testing different colors to use for demo purposes, -- Collecting steel dust & grits for the high school labs to use -- To toss a few from the bigger drawer into to take with me to a job. Most anything that gets lost easily or that fits when I only have a few of; unique things, mostly.
Printer labels stick great to them, a little heat and the Rx labels peel right off. I've even sold them for a quarter a piece at a garage sale once.
Cheers,
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Sun, Dec 30, 2007, 5:43pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@devnull.spamcop.net (Twayne) doth sayeth: <snip> oddball, small items like # 4, 6, 8 & 10 nuts & bolts, staples,low-quantity stuff I only have a couple of but can never find in a tin or drawer, things like that.<snip> Most anything that gets lost easily or that fits when I only have a few of; unique things, mostly. <snip> a little heat and the Rx labels peel right off. <snip> For those oddsand ends, I've got a large plastic jug in the shop. I toss any odd bolts, nuts, screws, nails, washers, whatever in it. If I need something off-the-wall I check there first. Saved me quite a few trips to town to get a nickel piece. Just dump iit out, sort thru it, dump it back in.
Labels on mine peel off with no heat needed.
JOAT If you can read this you're in range.
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I've amassed quite a collection of vials that my blood glucose test strips come in. They're a little smaller than an old-fashioned black plastic Kodak file canister, but are much more study and air-tight, with an attached snap-on lid. Black plastic outside, white plastic inside (I suspect there might be a dessicant in the white plastic).
Haven't tested them yet, re.: resistence to chemicals or solvents. But the white plastic insides makes little things like screws, nuts, pins, &tc. highly visible.
I'll test a few re: solvesnts and re-post.
-Zz
On Sun, 30 Dec 2007 02:40:34 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

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I use mine to store router bits till a holder for them gets made.

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