food safe oils

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I wanted to find a good oil, cheap that can be used on bowls and other food things. I saw walnut oil in a video. Have you tried coconut oil? The things that are important are a stable oil that doesn't go rancid. Doesn't smell bad, neutral's ok.
Have you tried cooking oils? Canola, grape seed, sunflower seed, etc. It's okay if the oil has to be re-applied now and again.
Mineral oil's readily available and I see people using that but it can get slightly gummy/sticky.
If you've tried an oil and like it that would be good to know about.
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IIRC, coconut oil doesn't dry so I would skip it (ditto mineral oil).
I would think that any oil that dries and which is derived from something edible would be fine. Personally, I use tung oil or boiled linseed oil, both are easy to find. Yes, the BLO has dryers in it but once cured it is fine.
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*ALL* vegetable oils can go rancid. In fact the drying process involves partial oxidisation, as does Oxidative rancidity. See <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rancidification>
Your only hope of avoiding a taint if left in contact with food containing lipids is to use an inert mineral oil or wax, or to use a coating that when fully cured is oil and solvent resistant.
I have a knife here that has an oak handle that was hot impregnated with pure paraffin wax (by repeatedly melting the wax into the surface with a hot air gun) when I made it some 20 years ago. It gets washed up normally nearly every day, with the only care being to hand dry it after use as it has a carbon steel blade. The handle will still take a good sheen if buffed with a paper towel and there has been absolulely no deterioration.
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Ian Malcolm. London, ENGLAND. (NEWSGROUP REPLY PREFERRED)
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On 12/14/2014 1:18 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Many cooking oils will go rancid.

Mineral oil shouldn't get gummy if you give it time to cure.

http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/article/food-safe-finishes.aspx http://www.woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/finishes/is-your-finish-food-safe/ http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2009/12/14/what-is-the-best-oil-for-treating-wood/ http://westbaywoodturners.com/tutorial/food_safe_finishes.html
Linseed oil keeps popping up on all the sites for "food safe wood finishing."
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On Monday, December 15, 2014 1:55:03 AM UTC-8, Just Wondering wrote:

Note, however, that 'boiled linseed oil' is NOT considered food safe; the 'boiled' variant has additives. Find USP (pharmacology grade, in the US) linseed oil if you want a food-safe product.
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On 12/20/2014 3:29 PM, whit3rd wrote:

Wrong. All commercial finishes today are food safe when dried and cured. http://www.woodcentral.com/articles/finishing/articles_497a.shtml
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2014 12:18:40 -0800, Electric Comet

Mineral oil is my choice. If it is getting gummy, too much is being applied. I've used in many times and never had a problem. Put on a few applications over time, not one big glop.
Cooking oil can go rancid.
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2014 12:18:40 -0800, Electric Comet wrote:

There's always these:
http://triedandtruewoodfinish.com/products.html
or forget the oil and use shellac - you eat it all the time.
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news.net:

Mineral oil doesn't cure.
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 05:55:09 -0500

Maybe that's the problem I encountered. Will have to try a lighter coat.

I thought I heard that coconut oil wouldn't go rancid but will have to do more research.
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2014 16:20:58 -0500

I am going to try on a test piece and leave it to see what happens.

Yeah, I've got those. There are a limited number of oils that "dry", I found out walnut oil is one too.
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 14:13:23 -0800, Electric Comet
Here, you can try any of these.
http://www.arbutusarts.com/food-safe-wood-finish.html
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 09:32:31 +0000 (UTC)

Yeah I may just go with beeswax. It's easy to communicate that to a customer too. Unless they don't know what is a bee.
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On 12/15/14, 4:39 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Carnuba wax is great if you have a buffing wheel to apply it. I'm not talking about Carnuba with an asterisk that comes in a paste for waxing cars. I'm talking about the solid blocks of 100% wax straight from the palm leaves.
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On 15/12/2014 4:24 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

The trouble with that is water will leave the surface spotty. It's impracticable as a salad bowl finish. Graham
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One cup of mineral oil and 3 oz by weight of beeswax. Heat until the beeswax melts. Safest way is a 250 oven for 30 minutes.
Walnut oil is good because it polymerizes. Be aware of nut allergies.
Mineral oil by itself is ok, and it does NOT go sticky in my experience.
Apply thin coats, always.
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On 19/12/2014 8:03 PM, Dave Balderstone wrote:

Which is pretty much like the products from Clapham: http://www.claphams.com/ Graham
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On Fri, 19 Dec 2014 21:03:43 -0600

Which form does it take after this? Is it like a paste or hard like a wax or liquid?

Yes, as do a few others I've found out.

It has done so on metal surfaces.
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On 12/20/2014 12:34 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

It has no place to go on metal. Wood absorbs it and becomes sealed in the process.
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On 12/20/2014 12:17 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Metal has voids and pits and all sorts. If it was 'flowed' with nickle it might not. Steel / iron are there. Rust starts in these places.
Martin
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