First part of kitchen countertop replacement complete

Finished the first section of the kitchen countertop replacement project: <http://mklange.cnc.net/KitchenCountertop.html
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Looking good! I use Wilsonart laminate every chance I get. That new finish looks pretty convincing.
How will you be rounding the peninsula corners?
r
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Robatoy wrote:

I'm thinking I will use angled cuts as opposed to an actual curve primarily because the outside edges will be edged with the cherry rail and the inside will be laminate edges to make cleaning easier and less worry about liquid damage to the wood
Warning: Bad ASCII art:
_____________ Inside workspace -- laminate edging \ End and outside workspace, cherry edging | | _____________/
A question for you, the overall length of the peninsula exceeds 12 feet, so I am going to need a seam, in your opinion, what is less distracting, an approximately 6" seam at the back of the peninsula where it intersects an "L" going to the stove, or making the "L" piece a single piece and letting the seam occur at the natural intersection of the two elements? If that question isn't clear, let me know and I will try to clarify.
"L" \/ Seam here? | | | | | | | | | | | |_____________________________ Peninsula extension | \ | | | | |__________________________________________/ /\ Or seam here?
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.

You don't want seams near corners. Hard to get around with mitres...I know.
A narrow strip like that will make a nice seam. Don't use the factory edge though. Trim with a sharp routerbit and a straight-edge about 1/2" from the end of the sheet. It is always a good idea to make sure you have a small inside radius at the inside corner. You also do not want a seam in the substrate at that corner. Offset by at least 3". Make sure the edge of the laminate is clean from glue before butting the strip to the edge of the big sheet.
When cleaning up the edges of the seam with a router bit.. a nice, sharp 1/2" bit works great.
Be prepared for some weird reflective things when adding the strip. Rotating HD series laminate 90degrees messes with the 'pattern'.... and I'm assuming you have to take your piece from the longitudinal waste. Bella Venito is pretty friendly.
Another trick: believe it or not, the 'base' of the colour is white. Running a hard tip of a permanent black marker on the very edge of the trimmed strip, will assist in hiding the visibility. Don't get any on the top.
I should be charging for these tips...you owe me 2 cents.
Good luck!
r
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Robatoy wrote:

Thanks.
... snip of some really useful information

Yep, your advice is greatly appreciated. How about I pass along something to someone else as payment? :-)
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Even better.
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 15:46:06 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Hey, I owe you 6 cents, can I do the same thing?
Thanks for all the very useful information. My ss counter came out great. When I get the backsplash finished, I'll post pic (if I can figure out how to do that).
Information about installation of the perforated flange studs, sink silicone, and mounting method all just right. I was worried about a sink, water dishes and a food disposer hanging on there being too much for those studs. I don't think I could knock them off with a 10 lb sledge. Guide blocks made all the difference in the world to get a neat install.
Thanks,
Frank
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hand in someone else's project.
Where did you end up buying the perforated flange studs?
r
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 07:09:19 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

I will, although regarding SS, I will give equal time to your original recommendation, that is, leave it to the pros. I have a lot more respect for that position with the lofty perch of hindsight. It is definitely not a casual DIY project. However, came out very well and I had the experience which were the goals. And of course, time will tell whether I broke any rules. Don't think I did, researched carefully.

Webb supply, Munford TN by mail order. No local supply houses had any. Worked well. Had standoff nibs to keep one from getting too much squeeze out. Used integra adhesive. Their web video helped to ease the anxiety about holding power.
Thanks again.
Frank

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Looks good, was you home built by "General Homes"? I recall General homes building houses about 20 years ago with the tile counter tops.
May I offer a suggestion for the other side "L"? I re-did my counter tops about 17 years ago much like you have. I have the wood front trim but used solid wood on the back splashes. 17 years later they still look fine. Anyway, and easier way to deal with that "L" is to simply cut a "1" piece "L" out of a full sheet of plywood. There is more waste but the fit is perfect with no seam in the corner of the "L" and no angles to cut and bring together.
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AH! You also use a larger sheet of plastic laminate to cover the one piece plywood base.
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Leon wrote:

contractor.
Thanks; I'll keep that in mind.
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Pink? Ugh!
We had the same type of tiling in our kitchen although at least it was white versus pink. I hated it. Really hated it.
Since the cabinets were sound, I refinished them and replaced the countertop with granite slab.
I've recently completed some other projects with laminate and I have to say that Formica laminate does appear to me to be slightly better (tougher and more stain resistent) than the Wilson Art equivalent.
Nevertheless, these shelves were done in Wilson Art and worked out pretty well:
http://www.malch.com/DSC_4757.jpg
The supports are standard PVC 0.5in water pipe painted with some spray enamel. 3/8in rebar running down the middle of each one. Alternate shelves are screwed to the studs to make it very stable. Very inexpensive and quite innovative I think, for a kids room.
I used oak ply and the undersides of the shelves are simply sanded, poly'ed and waxed. Some folks would prefer to have laminate undersides too but I like it the way it is and it saved me buying another sheet of laminate.
The edge banding is laminate and I glued that in place with epoxy for strength and used regular contact cement on the main surfaces.
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Malcolm Hoar wrote:

Very neat! That goes in the ideas to remember file.

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