Fine Homebuilding?

I currently subscribe to Fine Woodworking. Tauton Press has also sent me invitations to subscribe to Fine Homebuilding (FHB). I don't build homes but I do do projects inside my house (like shelves) and there's lots more I could do (according to SWMBO).
So the question I pose to this group: Do any of you subscribe to FHB and is it good for a home projects guy (who is not a home builder)?
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BTW, I read the table of contents for the last issue at http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/pages/fh_currentissue.asp . It has a few articles that interest me. I suppose if that's typical, it would not be worth the money for me. I'd stil like to hear opinions.
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I am a builder and do subscribe to it. I'm always game for learning something new and it is a great mag. SH
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Never Enough Money wrote:

I've been on-again/off-again over the years...I re-upped the last cheapo offer from Taunton...it was only about $20 for the year, I think. It's hit or miss on the value, although even if it's not something I'm going to do a fair amount is still interesting evening reading...probably most of what I gain from it is acquaintanceship to newer products/materials.
I have been consistent subscriber to FWW since about the 2nd year or so...it seems to me the article quality has gone down over the time frame--I suppose it's hard to keep coming up w/ really high quality articles consistently. I miss Tage Frid's articles a <bunch>.
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wrote:

I started subscribing to FHB a couple of years ago, primarily because we are planning to remodel the kitchen and I wanted a source of good ideas. Several things about FHB, they tend to focus on high-end type projects -- the kind in which an architect, a contractor, a landscape designer and an interior designer are involved. Of late, it also seems they are focusing on "green" building techniques and some of the commentary from the various authors of said articles is somewhat judgmental (to be kind) upon us common folk who can't afford those techniques. OTOH, it does have some good techniques for various things, for example, the December/January issue had a review of circular saws, a very helpful article on replacing broken ceramic floor tiles, and reader contributions similar to the ideas pages in FWW. In general, I recommend it as a home-owner's equivalent to FWW. Just as in FWW, some of the projects shown are beyond the capabilities of many of us, they give one something to aspire to and provide a quality template, if you will, for the way we can design and execute our projects compared to something like, for example a Woodsmith magazine that provides more intermediate level instructions for things like making mortises or fitting doors or hinges.
You might try picking it up from time to time before subscribing to see if it has enough worthwhile articles for you to subscribe.
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On 21 Dec 2004 17:05:29 -0800, "Never Enough Money"

I actually get a pretty decent amount of furniture and built-in ideas from that magazine. Some of the ideas come from articles that have nothing to do with built-ins, such as an article about painting that gave me some excellent cabinet detail ideas.
FHB also helps me keep up on decorating trends, without having to wade through stuff like "Architectural Digest's" articles on John Travolta's airport, I mean house. <G>
Barry
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Thanks for the good comments, folks!
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On 21 Dec 2004 17:05:29 -0800, "Never Enough Money"

it's geared towards construction professionals.
buy a couple of copies at the newsstand and see for yourself if you like the magazine.
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snipped-for-privacy@all.costs says...

Or go to the library, where you can look at back copies. My impression of the magazine is that it is very ethical in its editorial, as are the contractors, cabinet makers, et al, who write for it. In its field, I don't think anything printed comes even close to it, especially when compared to the self-serving pretentious This Old House.
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i just subscribed myself via magsonthenet.com
i've bought enough newsstand issues, finally decided to quit paying 7/copy
you might try bonusmags.com -- they show some really low prices, but i have no idea if they are legit or not. magsonthenet is legit and if you spend 50, 100 or so on you can get coupons off
On 21 Dec 2004 17:05:29 -0800, "Never Enough Money"

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We(actually she did most of it) contracted our own house. Been subscribers for 10-15 years. Occasionally great stuff. Lot's of stuff that is more for the pros.

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"Never Enough Money" wrote in message

The information for woodworkers in FHB is more of a cumulative effect over the years then specific in each issue, but there are some gems. There was an article on built-ins a few years ago that was better than most books on the subject.
Certainly worth a look on a monthly basis at the newsstand.
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I have subscribed to Fine Homebuilding for at least the past 10 years. We did eventually build our own home, but I enjoyed the magazine for years before and will continue subscribing unless the magazine changes significantly.
I have found lots of useful tips over the years, even if I wasn't building a house. I even get ideas from looking at the feature houses in each issue.
I also subscribe to The Family Handyman. I find it's oversimplified for my needs. They take 7-8 pages per article where Fine Homebuilding usually descibes the same task in 3-4 pages.
When I started subscribing to Fine Homebuilding there seemed to be more of a focus on "Small" homes and how to make the most efficient use of small spaces. These days there are lots of homes with 3000+ square feet being shown in the magazine as a "small" home. So, the magazine is losing my interest in that respect, even if it is just following the national trends.
I agree with the other posters, pick up a few issues first and see what you think of it.
Anthony
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HerHusband wrote: ...

...
I tend to see that, as well as the "pc" group is in some ascendence it seems, editorially as another posted noted. Not flaming, at least so far, thankfully, however...
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"HerHusband" wrote in message

trends.
I agree. I am currently building one for sale that is just a scooch under 3000+ square feet in an area where 3600 is the average. At the cornice stage, I am starting to second guess myself on whether the current yuppie crop is smart enough to notice what I thought I saw as an upcoming trend to "downsize" a bit.
Time will tell ... I generally manage to pick up something out FHB every month to make it worthwhile. When you're in the framing stage, an article on something as arcane as how headers are done in different parts of the country can be helpful. I've used their "rain screen" siding application article about three of four years ago on a couple of houses so far to good effect ("vent skin" here).
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Yeah, I don't understand the "bigger is better" mentality. We've got lots of mini-mansions going up around us in the 3000-4000 sq/ft range that are selling for a million dollars or more. Many are occupied by a couple or a very small family. Makes no sense to me.
We just completed our 1456 sq/ft home for under 60 thousand dollars. It's completely paid for, with no mortgage, and has all the space we'll ever need (family of three). And, it's small size doesn't mean cramped or cheap by any means. We have a large master suite, tiled bathrooms, australian cypress hardwood floors, 14 foot vaulted ceilings, lots of custom built-in cabinetry, a large covered porch, and much more. Just none of the wasted space those mini-mansions have.
Fine Homebuilding used to show lots of these kinds of homes. We got many ideas over the years for making the most of the available space. They still show smaller homes every now and then, but most are the typical mini- mansions.

Same here. I scan the articles I find interesting and keep them around for quick access. I refered to these articles many times during the construction of our home. Lots of great tips.

The "Graphic Guide to Frame Construction" is great for that too! I referred to that book a lot over the last couple of years.
Anthony
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wrote:

I think it depends upon what one does with the home. If one entertains a lot, then having a large kitchen and family area is needed to support that. Coupled with a desire for a large master suite and room for a home office, the number of square feet could be pushed up pretty quickly.
(No, I don't live in a mini-mansion -- we have 2400 square feet -- big enough for a family of three with a sewing room and a guest room, as well as a reasonably comfortable family room and kitchen area)

Sounds like a gloat

I sense an internal struggle in FHB, showing both large homes and smaller homes as well as all of the PC green commentary.
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On 21 Dec 2004 17:05:29 -0800, "Never Enough Money"

I've flipped through a few FHB at the bookstore, but never bought one. Magazines are good for checking out new tools and advertisements, but I think books are a much better buy.
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Tue, Dec 21, 2004, 5:05pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (NeverEnoughMoney) puts out: I currently subscribe to Fine Woodworking. <snip> So the question I pose to this group: Do any of you subscribe to FHB and is it good for a home projects guy (who is not a home builder)?
I don't subscribe to FHB, but I've read it, and enjoyed it - just not enough to subscribe. I don't subscribe to FWW anymore - I never made anything out of it, or even found much I really cared to make - so, turned out, it's not worth me subscribing. For some reason I let my subscription to WoodenBoats lapse (probably short of disposable income at the time), even tho I've never had any plans, or desire, to build a yacht - but It has pictures of some absolutely beautiful woodworking, and I really enjoy the magazine. I subscribe to Motor Trend, and enjoy it, even tho there's hardly a vehicle it it, I could ever afford to rent, let alone buy - Hell, I'll probably never even see most of them in real life - but I'll keep my subscription, for awhile anyway. So, I say, if you like FHB enough, subscribe; doesn't matter if you make anything out of it or not, as long as you like it - or, if you think you wouldn't be happy subscribing, then don't - your money, your call.
I quite subscribing to Live Steam because it was mostly locomotives, not enough steam boats.
Now, I need to go check into renewing my subscription to WoodenBoats.
JOAT Sanity is vastly over-rated.
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