Entry Door Opening Outside

Greetings,
is it possible to install an entry door that swings outside? That is, is there a type of hinge that is not exposed when the door is closed? Otherwise, an intruder can simply pop the hinges and remove the door.
Thanks, Yisroel
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On 6 Nov 2003 07:25:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@iname.com (Yisroel Markov) wrote:

house in other ways anyway. You can do what I did. Touch the hinge pin with my welder.
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Most hinge manufacturers make lock-pin hinges that won't allow the pin to be removed unless a set-screw locking the hinge pin is removed. The door has to be open to access the set screw.
Gary
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There are also studs which replace one of the screws on the hinge. One side is fixed and the other fits into the hole in the hinge (and a hole drilled beyond that.) Even if the hinge is removed, that side of the door can not be pulled out.
You could make one easily if you can't find one.
-Jack
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Many thanks to all who responded.
I've found fully recessed "invisible" hinges at www.soss.com and "non-removable" hinges at Home Depot.
As for snow/arsonists concerns, we do have another exit from the house, and this particular door is under a porch, so it's never snowed in. Installing it this way will ease entry and exit significantly - currently, the door, when opened, blocks more than half the stairway to our condo. And hanging it on the other jamb will do the same or worse to the entrance to the other condo.
Yisroel
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There are also hinges that have a kind of deadbolt that engages when closed. Even if you remove the pin, the door won't budge. You have to open the door to disengage the deadbolt. These are hard to find, however. I don't know the proper name for them and couldn't find them in a quick google search. I've seen them on heavy steel emergency exit doors that have to open outwards. A good locksmith probably knows about them.
I did find instructions for making your own. Basically, you cut a hole in the door and sink a matching bolt into the frame. Sort of a mortice in the door and tenon in the frame (or vice versa). The tenon has to be shaved on one side to allow the door to open and close. The tenon should be steel, brass, or something tough; ditto the border of the mortice.
Mike
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On Thu, 06 Nov 2003 17:54:58 GMT, "Michael Daly"

I just had a good quality steel out swinging exterior door made for my new shop. Got it today. Haven't even looked at it. I never asked about security. It didn't occur to me.
I will check it to see how they protected the hinges.

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Hinges aside, it may not meet your building code, especially if you live in a snow region.
Swing out doors can be blocked by vandals, arsonists, or just nasty neighbors. Ed
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Silly code. A simple hook on the doorknob which catches on the outside casing prevents a person from opening a in swinging door. Cops use these to prevent people running out the back. I would rather trust my weight against an out swinging door.
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Snow can be pretty heavy. On the other hand an in-swinging door might be blocked by your feet and you couldn't open it.
-Jack
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There is always a contradiction, Houses have most doors swing Inward, But that is against the law in a commercial place Go Figure
My rear door was hung when they built the house swinging out, Wife wants a screen Air in Bugs out, could not do so I re swung the door Checked with several neighbors they all had rear doors swinging out, so some shmuko that was working on this unit screwed up and they let it pass.

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Commercial places have to contend with emergency exits - they must swing outwards. No one would want to be at the front of a panicked crowd only to find they have to pull the door _in_ to open it. What gets interesting is where exits connect two commercial establishments - which way does it swing? I vaguely remember that there are rules, but from looking at installations, it appears to be random.
OTOH, outward opening doors can have advantages for homes - like freeing up interior space at the expense of exterior space.
Clearing snow and other things is not too onerous. You have to be diligent though.
Mike
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wrote:

They swing in the direction of egress. That is towards the closest exit corridor or exit.
-Jack
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