Emulating Scrub Plane

When I was at the WoodWorking Show, someone from LN/V showed me how to emulate a scrub plane. He was using a Low-angled plane with a blade that appeared to be ground with a lot of camber. Now I'm asking myself whether it would be helpful for it to be "dished" as well--or wouldn't that matter because of the amount of camber? I intend to try the same idea with my #5 Jack plane (comments welcome--please!). Intuitively, making the blade iron "dished" means removing more metal which seems bad.
Bill
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A jack with a fair amount of camber in the iron and an open mouth would have been the starting place for board preparation in centuries past.... then a jointer and then a smoother. The scrub is a relatively recent development!
John
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Crowning the edge works well enough. Additional advantage is, when the narrow working part of the edge is dull, tilting the iron brings a sharp edge back into play.
The 5 will make a good scrub once you set the frog back.
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wrote:

Crowning the edge works well enough. Additional advantage is, when the narrow working part of the edge is dull, tilting the iron brings a sharp edge back into play.
The 5 will make a good scrub once you set the frog back. ____________
Thank you very much! And John Grossbohlin, thank you for the brief history lesson--I'm doomed to repeat it! ; )
Bill
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