Dust Collector Nightmare HELP!!!

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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 12:18:41 GMT, Jim Behning

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I don't have a link, I bought mine locally (in Tucson) from a manufacturer who actually makes the stuff. FWIW:
Metal Manufacturing Company 4795 South Julian Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85714 (520) 748-1117
I also got my elbows and y's from them as well.
The lining is a blueish tint and seems reasonably smooth as well as serving as a seal for the seams.
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That sounds like really neat stuff to reduce the problems of leaky standard sheet metal.

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Jim Behning said:

Not to butt in here, but is there some reason you don't use HVAC tape to seal those "leaky standard sheet metal" pipes? Pretty common product used to, well, seal metal HVAC pipes... ;-)
I use it for just this purpose. An aluminized adhesive tape that withstands all extremes of heat and cold. I keep several rolls of it around, as it's useful for all sorts of things. Sits right next to the duct tape, which curiously enough, is not as useful for ductwork.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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Better, faster for duct work. You can do some real covering up of stuff with the mastic. I just find it easier to work with. Hey if you want you can come over and help me strike a dust collection system. It can't be but 15 miles from your house. Nothing more fun that years of dust accumulated on the top of duct work. Or taking down 6 foot long dust bags which probably had not been cleaned since I left the place over 6 years ago.
Greg G. wrote:

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Jim Behning said:

I'm familiar with mastic sealant, but the last reference I saw in this thread was M&J's reference to blue lined pipe at some exorbitant price. Maybe I missed a few messages in between... :-\
You wouldn't happen to be removing this DC from a place in Austell? I snagged a bunch of leftover plywood from a cabinet shop there when they closed up a few years ago. Mostly used for shop jigs and such.
Helping might be an interesting experience - who gets the DC? ;-) What part of town are you/is this in and when are you removing it? BYODM? (Bring Your Own Dust Mask) ;-)
Greg G.
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Downtown Atlanta. I looked at some of the smaller duct and the spiral duct is a lot smoother than I expected. In other words I was wrong about the stuff being leaky and rough.
I don't what I will do with it. It is a Torrit with at least 4 dust bags but may have more bags. I just forget how many. It also uses two 55 gallon drums for large chip collection. You need about 10 feet of height to install the beast. I think it is a Model 230-5fb-255. Maybe I can trade it for a good size Jet DC and some cash.
Greg G. wrote:

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Jim Behning said:

The spiral duct I've seen is fairly smooth, and the joints are fitted better than the knocked down, snap-lok sheet metal pipes generally seen. The only downside is that it is more expensive, probably mostly due to increased shipping costs.

Sounds a bit large for my needs... ;-) My "shop" is only 9 feet tall. There's a guy who owns a print/sign shop that might be interested in it, but he is soooo cheap. He currently blows the stuff out into the back lot with several large blowers and I believe the Fire Marshal is on his case about it.
Greg G.
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On Thu, 21 Oct 2004 02:52:52 -0400, Greg G. wrote:

??? Exhorbitant price? I never mentioned what I paid for the pipe. However, just to set the record straight: 4" was $10.13 per 10 foot section, 5" was $9.16 per 10 foot section. 5" was cheaper because I bought 10 of them and only two 4" pipes. I thought those were pretty reasonable prices.
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Mark & Juanita said:

LMAO. OK, it was a brain spasm. I read messages every couple of days, when I have time - and after 150 or so, they all start to run together. I saw some mention in some thread - my memory not being what it used to be - for pipe at prices that seemed excessive. Your price quotes seem reasonable enough.
Greg G.
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Where did you buy your pipe? Sounds like a good price to me. Thanks
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On 22 Oct 2004 05:07:42 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (jack) wrote:

A place called Metal Manufacturing Co in Tucson:
Metal Manufacturing Company 4795 South Julian Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85714 (520) 748-1117
They fabricate your order to order, so the best way to get a good price is order all of your material at once -- if you forget something, the subsequent costs for a small number of pieces is much higher.
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When I did mine, I realized that every tool almost has a 4" collection hood. This is because when DC's were introduced to the home WW'er, they were 4" to begin with and the after thought of dust hoods were also made 4" to match the DC input. When I changed the size of the collection hoods on my tools there was no affect on the dust collection process.
Here's a note. To start with, I was using a 4" line into the collection hood of my planer which went from 4" round to a 4" square. This meant that there was 12.56 sq in. area where the air from the dust collector was coming from was being drawn from a 16 sq in area hood. This meant that before anything could be done, there was a 25% drop in the efficiency of the DC dust collection when it was hooked up because of the dust hood design. When a 2.5 inch line was made as the DC line there was a 7.85 sq in suction area from the same 16 sq in. hood, which made a less than a 50% loss. When the hood was redesigned to a 8.2 sq in suction area, the dust from the new hood rushes from the planner as fast as if you were picking the dust from the floor. Thus the hoods of all tools were redesigned to be a better comparison from the vacuum line to the hood. Now, even a shop vac would work well on my planner.
-- Woody
Check out my Web Page at:
http://community-1.webtv.net/WoodworkerJoe/WoodworkerJoesInfo
Where you will find:
******** How My Shop Works ******** 5-21-03
* * * Build a $20 DC Separator Can Lid. 1-14-03 * * * DC Relay Box Building Plans. 1-14-03 * * * The Bad Air Your Breath Everyday.1-14-03 * * * What is a Real Woodworker? 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Definitions. 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Laws. 4-6-03 * * * What is the true meaning of life? 1-14-03 * * * Woodworker Shop Signs. 2-8-03
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I'm a mechanical engineer and being doing alot of calculations on compressible and noncompressible fluid systems for the last 27 years and I can tell you that you did not read enough, AND, you are heading down the wrong path..
Figuring a dust collection system is trial an error if you have not picked out your blower.
First, you want the stuff moving in those pipe at 4000 feet per minute. Pick your longest run and hopefully the piece of equipment that has the most load. Calculate all the pressure drops through the system, including hoods, entrance losses and losses through the filters. For larger shop tools, 800 cfm is a good figure to use for flow rate and 500 cfm for smaller tools. 3" pipe will give you about 16,000 fpm for the 800cfm and 500cfm will yield 5/8ths of that. It will sound like a jet running.
You better go get some help before you make a real costly mistake.
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