Dust Collector in Basement With Furnace?

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Would it be a horrible idea to place a dust collector next to our furnace? I know that small dust particles are highly combustible but not sure if the furnace is sealed enough or if a DC is clean enough for this not to be a worry. The furnace is in a basement area under the house which is well ventilated.
Damian
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damian penney wrote:

Even more of a pita will be the micro-dust that escapes will then be "right there" to be blown all over the house--furnace filters won't come close to collecting it...
I doubt you would have enough to be a combustion issue (at least w/o a collector failure like a hole).
IMO, YMMV, $0.02, etc...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

I'll note that while the furnace isn't supposed to be picking up circulation air, there are always some leaks...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

but
enough for

the
be
come
w/o a

Hmmm, okay next question, how do DC's deal with being outside in the rain :)
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damian penney wrote:

They don't. But you could combine two of your posts, build an enclosure outside. A parishioner of mine is doing exactly that. His HF 16CFM (advertised) will actually have about 1200 CFM throughput and no costly filter bags, just the 30 micron bag that comes with it.
Deb
Deb
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Well the air for the furnace is being sucked in from the living room which is above the basement so it wouldn't be drawing the dusty air from the basement.
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The dust tends to permeate everything over time, with or without a DC. Use the 5 micron bags and it will help.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

room
DC. Use

Hmmm, it's sounding as though this isn't a great idea... Is there anyway to make it work? Sure would be nice to have the DC outside the shop and the basement is perfectly located.
Damian
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damian penney wrote:

Best bet is to build a closet to hold it--contains dust and minimizes noise as well...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

air
a
the
How would the DC deal with being in an enclosed area, would I just vent the closet outside or wouldn't that be needed? Thanks for all the input here guys.
Damian
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damian penney wrote: ...

Would depend on the relative sizes of the DC and the enclosure...ideally, an exterior vent would be the best route for inside a dwelling...Otherwise, you do still have a potential problem w/ capturing the fines.
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Of course, if you vent it outside, you're heating or cooling all that air that you need to bring back inside to replace the 1200cfm... Could get a little pricy.
Clint

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Clint wrote:

air
get a

just vent

input
inside
Well I live in Oakland, California and the shop is in an unheated garage whose door is wide open when I'm in the shop so heating isn't an issue.
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on 3/7/2005 1:19 PM Clint said the following:

I'm considering a DC for my shop but not that keen about a) putting the DC IN the shop and b) now that the shop is heated I really don't want to heat the great outdoors.
I'm thinking along the lines of either a "chase" built onto the back of the garage or a closet built into existing space inside the garage (shop is a separate insulated 13x24 room with 2 car garage under the same roof) which would be insulated and have one or more vents leading right back into the shop thus venting the "clean" exhaust from the DC right back into the shop. Insulated door to the outside to allow for emptying the DC.
I'm thinking a couple of regular furnace filters snapped into frames that would sit between the stud wall which would be opened up and fire-stopped to allow for the flow of air.
Not 100% but better than anything else I can think of at the moment. Anyone else tried this or have a better suggestion? Like anyone else, I just don't want to tie up any floor space in the shop with a DC when it could better be used for bench or tool space.
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damian penney wrote:

See my addendum to my previous post where I anticipated you... :)
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on 3/7/2005 9:40 AM damian penney said the following:

Whoa! Apples and oranges.
First, the air being heated, IF (and I stress this since the OP did not say he had forced air heat) it's a forced air system is essentially a closed system relative to the firebox. The air drawn in by the cold air return is reheated and recirculated in the plenum which is separate and apart from the the combusion ongoing with a gas or oil-fired furnace.
The air for combustion will be drawn in from either the immediate area of the furnace or, in the case of newer furnaces, from the outside. The exhaust will go outside. In the case of the latter, there's probably little chance of there being a problem with the DC other than - as someone else posted - some of the dust being sucked in to the cold air return (if there happens to be one in the area of the furnace and spread all over SWMBO's domain. Bad ju-ju for sure.
If it's hydronic heat there's no problem with the furnace circulating dust but the cautions about the dust being ignited by the combustion process still apply dependent upon the type of the system.
I'm guessing but unless there was a helluva lot of dust in the air I don't think it would be a fire safety problem. If he hasn't been "launched" yet, I doubt adding dust collector to the mix would increase his odds; likely they'd decrease since, after all, the dust is already present in all its various sizes. Add the DC and all you have left is the very smallest amounts.
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Just a point of information. Hydronic systems have boilers (even though the water may not actually boil) and hot air heaters are referred to as furnaces.
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Remember, A DC will add positive air pressure to an enclosed basement. Your furnace should only be using outside air for combustion so the dust *should* not be an issue. I would build an enclosure for it in the basement, vent the enclosure to the outside with a 12" tube. This should solve the positive air problem and vent most of the fine duct particles.
You might consider putting a cyclone outside so that empting the sawdust is not a big issue as well.
Dave
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Teamcasa wrote:

but
for
basement. Your

*should*
vent
sawdust is

Okay, that sounds like a plan. Thanks everyone.
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This is not a good idea. A DC is best in a far corner of the room. I walled off the "utility" area in the basement and installed a pre-hung exterior door to get a good seal. Dust buildup in a furnace is not good, plus this is a way to spread the dust to upper floors.
wrote:

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