drilling deep 3/4" holes

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Maybe I'm missing something here but why the insistence on using a Forstner bit on a through hole? Why not just use an auger bit (manual or powered) for the entire length of the hole? Maybe clamp a piece of scrap on the other side to minimize blowout or BugBear's suggestion....

To make things easier, a bit gauge or piece of tape wrapped around the auger bit can be used so you know when to stop boring.

Cheers, Mike
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Insistence? I'm open to all kinds of suggestions. I just happened to have Forstner bit and was familiar with its high quality cuts using a drill press. Auger bit was suggested several times and its a good idea. I happened to find a 3/4" brad drill bit and decided to use that.
Bob
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I didn't mean it particularly to you Bob. I was just wondering why most of the follow-ups provided ways to bore a deeper hole with a Forstner rather than suggesting that you can accomplish the task with a plain ole' auger bit (or brad point bit as you describe below). Since many of the posters are more experienced wooddorkers than myself, I thought that I might have not understood the problem correctly, hence the preface clause in my question above.

I think that should work fine. Good luck and please let us know how the bench turns out.
Cheers, Mike
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Thanks, Mike. One of the things I have learned in my short experience as a woodworker is that there are usually at least two good ways to accomplish a goal and perhaps one of those can be done without buying another tool. Unfortunately, getting by without buying something rarely happens.
Bob
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Regarding "at least two good ways to accomplish a goal": Just to throw another monkey wrench into the works, you can always opt for rectangular bench dogs where making the dog holes is simply a matter of routering (or dadoing) some slots into one of the boards before gluing up the top. I chose that route for my bench but I don't think there's any huge advantage to either approach over the other.
Cheers, Mike
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There's always advantages and disadvantages to different types. A round bench dog will turn in it's slot to flatly face whatever is pressed against it. Square ones can't do that and maybe slightly more likely to leave an impression on the wood butted up against it. I'm sure there's some advantages to square dogs over round ones, but can't think of any right this moment.
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wrote:

expanded tops, some are 2x1" stock with 3/4 turned bases and I have 2 of those HF iron clamping pegs... all part of my "try everything and learn" system.. *g*
Mac
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wrote:

I used a 3/4 spade bit, but if the top layer of my bench was hardboard instead of particle board I would of (after reading this thread) done the holes about 1/2 deep with the forstner and finished them with the spade... more for appearance, I think... forstner holes look so pretty..
Mac
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Bob writes:

A brace and a ships auger.
Lew
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Hi, Lew. what, if any, is the difference between a ships auger and any other kind of auger? I found pictures of ship auger bits on EBay, the spiral part (flute?) looks thicker along the bits cutting axis than some others I've seen, is that the only difference? How about the tool that drives it, the shank looks hexagonal. Will it fit in a brace and bit? Tia.
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