Dog holes

I was watching a NYW video today and Norm was cutting the bench-dog holes 4-degrees "inward" (toward the vise) so that his wooden dogs weren't pushed enough toresultantly lose their grip on the work.
I am just curious since it caught me by surprise. Is it standardprocedure to cut bench holes this way,or just with wooden dogs, or neither?
P.S. Don't tell my wife I was thinking about getting a dog, or she'll be all over it!; )
Bill
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"Bill" wrote in message

That is an "it depends" question... it depends on the type of dog. Hold fasts and most dogs do not need angled holes but those like Norm made would benefit from them.
John
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

Thank you for your reply. I'll take a closer look at those he was using
Bill

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On 3/11/2013 7:59 PM, Bill wrote:

I use both Veritas dogs and pups which has an angle already in the hold down, and I use home made stops for various things. The require straight . I also use gramercy holdfasts, which work better with a straight hole.
If I had square dogs they would be at an angle... probably less than 4 though.
--
Jeff

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It depends on the table top's thickness, also. The thicker the top, the mo re vertical the hole can be. Tops less than 1 1/2" thick would likely requ ire some angling, either the hole or the dog. If a bench is made with two 3/4" sheets of ply, another 6" wide strip, under neath, would make it thick er along the line of holes.
The function of holdfasts, particularly, are dependant on hole size and thi ckness of table..... as well as the holdfast's *angle.
On a side note: A few weeks back, I thought to try to make my own holdfast s, so I did a little research about them. I wondered how I could properly heat my rods, for bending, etc., without having a welder's torch.
Just so happens, this past weekend, I was given permission to go visit an o ld abandon saw mill and was allowed to collect whatever relics I thought of interest. I was specifically looking for a saw blade, for my shop's decor . I picked up an old Buffalo forge. Looks in pretty bad shape, but I'll see if I can get it operating, something maybe fun to mess with, rather tha n fixing for long term use.
The mill was originally started by my aunt's husband and his brother (1920s or so), so a token of that past family history is there. The place was al l grown up with weeds, vines, shrubs, trees, etc. I spent about 4 hours wa lking around, looking at all the old decaying buildings, about 10-12, and i magined what all took place in each, like which one had the still in it, ju dging from all the whiskey and wine bottles in one area, and, knowing my un cle's family was Baptist, had a thought of (when the milling was slow), "He y Bubba, lets go to the mill and saw some wood!"
It was a nice day's get-away.
Sonny
Sonny
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On Monday, March 11, 2013 6:59:05 PM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

I made my own tapered dogs on the lathe. Tap them into the conventional hole with the but of my hand and they stay put. Usually come right back out with tug or a nudge to the side. Being wood, they are less likely to mar an edge.
RonB
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Bill wrote the following on 3/11/2013 7:59 PM (ET):

I thought you were going to ask how to stop a dog from digging in the yard. :-)
I was a Metalsmith in the US Navy back in the late 1950s. I only dealt with steel dogs. The holes in the steel table were round and the steel dogs were bent, sort of like the number "7". The dogs were inserted in the hole and onto the work, then tapped down with a hammer to clamp the work. The difference in wooden dogs rather than steels dogs is the hole is angled rather than the dog itself.
pic of shop. Note the dogs on the rail below the tabletop and one in use on the table. https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/Kr_HYHXGkQTvcT5nWKt5tNtRoYS1luOVtjHdVwQiWec?feat=directlink&full-exif=true Or: http://preview.tinyurl.com/czjke3h
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Those sound like "hold fasts." A picture and description can be found at (this was a quick image search): http://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/item/MS-HOLDFAST.XX
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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willshak wrote the following on 3/14/2013 10:56 AM (ET):

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/Kr_HYHXGkQTvcT5nWKt5tNtRoYS1luOVtjHdVwQiWec?feat=directlink&full-exif=true

Sorry, wrong link. https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/Kr_HYHXGkQTvcT5nWKt5tNtRoYS1luOVtjHdVwQiWec?feat=directlink or: http://preview.tinyurl.com/cgeepz4
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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