Does fresh epoxy stick to dried epoxy?


I 'm using slow set epoxy .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Absolutely!
Dave
Icepick wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well that is encouraging and since I glued up a project last night I'll let you know how it went in a couple of days.
David wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Seems to have worked fine.
Icepick wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But it's a good idea to sand the surface of the old epoxy first. That will remove any amine blush and roughing the surface will also give the new epoxy a bit of bite.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Though of course... epoxy does not dry, it hardens.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
True; but I knew what meant. :)
Dave
toller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Though of course... epoxy does not dry, it hardens.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
deja vu.
Dave
toller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RE: Subject
If you lay new resin on resin that is less than 24 hours, no problems.
If you wait past 24 hours, the existing resin may develop an amine blush which is easily removed with a ScotchBrite pad and water.
I always sand the old resin with a 24 grit disk before laying new resin on top of old.
HTH
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I roughed it up quite a bit before re-epoxing so the epoxy should bond alright... I hope ;-)
Epoxy is great stuff . I was wondering if a non-toxic variety of epoxy has been developed yet ?
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Icepick wrote:

Not that I'm aware of.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In addition to these, there are many non-toxic epoxy coatings.
http://www.lkecity.com/putty.html
Food-Safe Adhesive A two-component, low-viscosity EP48 epoxy has high strength and good electrical insulation properties. It can be used to seal and coat metallic and nonmetallic substrates and conforms to Title 21, U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, FDA Chapter 1, Section 175-105 and 173.300 for food applications. The epoxy has a 100:75 mix ratio and is 100% reactive. It resists chemicals and prolonged submersion in water, dilute acids, alkalines, aggressive organic solvents, ethanol, isopropanol, mineral spirits, and gasoline. EP48 has a Shore-D hardness of 70+ and a tensile strength of 5 kpsi. It is available in pint, gallon, and 5-gallon kits.
Masterbond Inc., 154 Hobart St., Hackensack, NJ 07601, (201) 343-8983, masterbond.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

<snip>
Don't confuse uncured with cured states.
Uncured, amine hardener based epoxies are definitely toxic.
Cured, they are inert.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Years ago I bought an expensive kit of blue epoxy for a GE dishwasher rack. Now I'm wondering if that was a "non-toxic" type of epoxy...
Dave
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.