Delta 40-150 15" scroll saw -- loose upper arm?

Used machine. Supposed to be able to push the arm left - right a full 1/4"? Looks like the bronze pivot bolt sleeve is worn. Any way to shim to within useful tolerances? Less than perfect is fine enough.
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On Thursday, January 10, 2013 1:29:18 PM UTC-8, Father Haskell wrote:

Looks like the bronze pivot bolt sleeve is worn. Any way to shim to within useful tolerances? Less than perfect is fine enough. Sounds pretty sloppy. Looks like you can get any parts you might need for a fix. http://www.toolpartsdirect.com/cgi-bin/schematic.cgi/delta/40-150 /
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Unfortunately, the Twinkie isn't the only thing that went extinct in recent memory. http://www.toolpartsdirect.com/cgi-bin/parttools.cgi/1341407
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On Thursday, January 10, 2013 4:13:37 PM UTC-6, Father Haskell wrote:

That part number is for the whole lower arm, with bushing. The schematic doesn't indicate where the pivot point/bushing is. Is it at part 43 location or at part 34 location? .... or is there a bushing at both parts 43 & 34 locations?
Not being knowledgeable with metal works, I would suppose an outlet, as Grainger, would have some sheets of shimming materials.
I would think Grainger, or similar outlet, might have "generic" bushings that could be trimmed/filed/tweaked to proper outer size, to insert into the bushing "housing", after drilling out the old worn bushing from the arm.
Would shimming be easier than trying to replace the old bushing, with a generic, if available?
Sonny
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Since you were speaking of the upper arm, the bushing would be at the part 7 (bolt) location.
Sonny
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That's her. I guess they're sold as one piece because not many people own arbor presses. Wonder if a thin piece of brass or beer can cut into a "washer" wouldn't take up enough play to make the saw useful for roughing out carvings.
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On Thursday, January 10, 2013 8:27:27 PM UTC-6, Father Haskell wrote:

For something that size, a large C-clamp or vise, with custom jig, could be made into an appropriate press.

I was thinking the original bushing is a sleeve, easily(?) fitted/pressed into the arm (housing), through which the bolt passes through, and not a washer that would be between the arm and the bolt head. Or does the original bushing/sleeve suppose to have a lip on it, the lip being the "washer" spacing you propose/speak of, between the arm housing and bolt head.
I'm thinking, any good hardware store should have standard brass sleeve bushings available, for a replacement. Any moderate/large city should have a specialty store for fittings/bushings as such. Available online, also.
If all that's needed is specific spacing/stability between the arm and bolt head, I've, at times, further flattened copper sheeting or pennies, to make shims or washers.... further flattening, to desired thickness, by creaping up on the thickness needed for specific spacing. I would trust copper or brass to hold up, more so, than the aluminum of a beer can.
Sonny
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On 1/10/2013 9:27 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

easily replaced. A machine shop would probably do the work for you for about $20-30. The might be able to press it out, or may have to heat the arm up a little to then press it out.
I'll bet they have the correct bushing, and if not can drill out an undersize bushing.
Take it to them for a price. Take the bolt.
--
Jeff

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