Deglossing a Waterlox finish: how long until fully cured?

Page 2 of 2  
Photo posted of deglossing test: http://www.windinthetrees.com/table /
Test deglossing of six rag-wiped coats of Waterlox on a white oak table leaf: Used gray "scotch-brite"-type pad by itself (no wax) on half closest to camera. Tried a white pad first and as had been predictied by netizens, its impact was amost unnoticable.
I'm not a big fan of the high shine on the untouched portion on the back half of the leaf, but I'm a bit suprised at my feeling that the deglossed portion seems "dead". Having spent the last three weeks seeing the shine, I'm going to wait a day or two to see if I get used to the deglossed look before continuing.
Perhaps the suggestions to finish up with waxing need to be reconsidered! :-)
Advice, suggestions and critiques welcome -- email or leave 'em in the newsgroup.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I try to wait a week if I can in 70+ degree environment before rubbing out a Waterlox finish. I have tried the white Scotch-Brite, but go back to 0000 Steel Wool and wax as it seems to give a more uniform and softer glow. Have had the best luck with Arborwax, but have used everything from Briwax to Trewax. Buff a little after the wax/steel wool and you will have a very fine finish that never fails to get questions about "how did you get such a nice finish".
I have also used this technique with polyurethane as the base varnish, to rescue a piece from the dreaded plastic coated look and feel (grin).
Sawblade
snipped-for-privacy@his.com (Ladd Morse) wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Received an email from the folks at Waterlox and they said I could expect the finish to be fully cured in 3-5 days. So your advice is pretty close. And either time frame is much quicker than the month I had expected.

As the table will be used in the kitchen, the protection purportedly offered by Waterlox was one of the major reasons for selecting that particular finish. Putting wax on top of this finish seems to be reducing the "little-to-no-care" and "protection from water and other common kitchen chemicals" aspects.
However, if it turns out that the look presented by waxing the table is really what I wanted from the beginning and didn't know it until now, I'm guessing I should have gone with an oil finish to begin with.
Reading older messages in this newsgroup via Google, I recall clearly one poster saying that it would be best to use Scotch-Brite instead of steel wool, as the tanins in the oak, even covered with multiple coats of finish, would eventually react with whatever small bits of steel wool are left behind and cause discoloration. Sounded good to me, so I purchased both white and gray pads.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.