Dealing with saw dust while hand sanding

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I recently completed a cherry headboard for a queen bed. After listening to Bill Bush at a local woodworking show, I have become a fan of hand sanding rather than using a random orbital sander with dust removal. The headboard came out great but the sawdust was a real mess. The headboard was too big for any downdraft table. All I could do was wear a good mask and then clean up the very fine dust which had drifted all over the place. Is there some way I could have used my Jet dust collector to help out? I have read very mixed reviews of the dust collectors that hang from the ceiling.
Your thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
Dick
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If shop space is at a premium, maybe next time make a bigger, temporary downdraft table? Tom
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wrote:

If shop space is at a premium, maybe next time make a bigger, temporary downdraft table? Tom
The headboard is 64" wide and 20" high. If I made a temporary downdraft table, I wonder with it being so big if I would get enough suction to actually accomplish anything.
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The actual downdraft area doesn't have to be the entire length of the piece. Think roller stands...
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Dick Snyder wrote:

the inlet side near your sanding. Won't get all the dust, but you'll find a lot of dust on the filter after a sanding session. You can shop-vac the filter to clean.
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Huh. That sounds like a pretty simple solution. Thanks. I'll give it a shot.
Dick
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At one time, I had one with a cleanable filter. When it got dirty enough, it got washed out with the hose. Don't know if they still make them, but if you're doing this often it might be a good investment.
FYI, box fans aren't made to run weeks or months on end.
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

--------------------------- Biggest reason current generation is supplied with a built in, non replaceable fuse in the plug.
Biggest problem is to keep bearings lubricated.
Based on end of year price of less than $10, treating one as a throw away is NBD.
BTDT, don't need the T-Shirt
Lew
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On Fri, 12 Feb 2010 08:00:42 -0700, the infamous Doug Winterburn

Hmm...the tiny amount a box fan filter does pick up is the larger stuff which won't damage your lungs as badly.
Better to tape a small diameter hose to the bottom of your sanding wrist to catch much more of the fine dust in the HEPA dust collector bags.
I think I'd prefer to use the RAS for most of the work and then, always, do a final hand-sanding, wet solvent pre-finish prep, and hand finishing (sans stain or poly, of course.)
-- It's a great life...once you weaken. --author James Hogan
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On 2/15/10 1:43 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Using your radial arm saw for small sanding jobs are ya, Larry? :-p
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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september.org:

With one of those new Freud blades that cuts the wood to correct width and length (the packages I saw Friday at HD said that), Larry obviously no longer needs his RAS for cutting wood. Might as well use it for something.
:-)
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 17:00:11 -0600, the infamous -MIKE-

Oops, I meant ROS, not Radio Alarm Saur.
P.S: Ackshully, that stood for Radial Art Sandah.
-- It's a great life...once you weaken. --author James Hogan
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Please get hand sanding pads with integrated dust removal connections (Festool or Mirka hand pads), they connect directly to a vacuum cleaner. 2ndly, get proper sanding paper - Mirka Abranet is really, really good - it's not real sanding paper, but rather a sanding mesh - so there's a hole through which to vacuum the dust off every 0.5 mm - so the dust removal very efficient.
These solutions also work with drywalling etc., where a downdraft table is totally useless.
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Please get hand sanding pads with integrated dust removal connections (Festool or Mirka hand pads), they connect directly to a vacuum cleaner. 2ndly, get proper sanding paper - Mirka Abranet is really, really good - it's not real sanding paper, but rather a sanding mesh - so there's a hole through which to vacuum the dust off every 0.5 mm - so the dust removal very efficient.
These solutions also work with drywalling etc., where a downdraft table is totally useless.
I have Mirka Abranet mesh. I agree that you can suck up a lot of saw dust through the mesh but I want to stay with my hand sanding blocks. I am using 2 3/4" self adhesive paper on those soft yellow sanding blocks. I like the idea of total control over what I am sanding but I hate all the mess...................
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On 2/15/10 1:43 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Using your radial arm saw for small sanding jobs are ya, Larry? :-p
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

My $0.02. I consider floor space to be precious, so strive for solutions that don't use up any. I don't often succeed, but at least try to minimize the space I have to give up for storing something else. As much as I'd love to have a downdraft table, I can't afford to give up any more floor space, so have to think of another method.
Why not sand it in the driveway or patio or back yard? Clean off with compressed air or leaf blower before bringing it back inside. Not very elegant, but beats cleaning out every nook and cranny in the shop before the annual Leaf Blower Cleanup Day.
Consider building a movable dust collection hood out of 1/4 ply or even heavy corrugated, something like the type used by turners, but maybe 8'' wide and 24" long, or whatever works out best for the plywood scraps you have on hand.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Put the headboard on sawhorses and mount the hood on the base of a roller stand or something and move it under the area you plan to sand next. That at least should get the heft of the sawdust.
Regards, Roy
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"Roy" wrote:

Working in a boat yard in SoCal, outdoors is a way of life.
A couple of saw horses and a couple of 2 x 2 x 1/8 x 96 aluminum angles and you are good to go.
Pieces rest on a knife edge which makes it easy to apply finish when ready.
Quick set up, quick knock down.
YMMV
Lew
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I simply lay a 4" hose in close proximity to the area being sanded and occasionally pick it up to clean swarf off the board and paper. One point Bill makes in his hand sanding presentation is to keep the paper clean with a brush. I do that and brush the dust towards the end of the hose. This works well enough for occasional use but if I were doing this every day a big down draft table set up would be more convenient.
John
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wrote:

that a filter gets some of what dust collectors miss..
If you have one of those adjustably height roller stands for cutoffs and stuff, use cable ties or plumbers tape to hold a 4" DC hose near your sanding.. It makes a huge difference..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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I'd use my flexible 4" hose with a brush. (http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p2103&cat=1,43456,43465).Rig up a way to keep the end of the hose near the area you are sanding.
Maybe add this: http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2005206/173/Table-Top-Dust-Collector.aspx or some similar fitting from the HVAC section at Home Depot.
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