Daughter's wedding present.

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This is a bit of a blend between Arts & Crafts and Mission...the table came out more looking like Metro. I stole the design components from all over the place. So here is my question: Do the table and chairs look compatible?
I was thinking cherry, any other suggestions?
(I also made sure that it was reasonably easy to fabricate)
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/DiningMetro.jpg
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IMHO, they certainly look "compatible" though not necessarily similar. The curve in the chair back rail seems incongruent with the sharp angles on the table. Not necessarily bad nor bad-looking, just not equivalent (I'm not sure how exactly to express this correctly)
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Sorry for the second follow-up, hit "send" too soon.
a) Cherry would look quite nice for this style. b) Downloaded and brightened up the picture, I missed the curves on the seat rails in my previous comment. As I mentioned in my previous post, it's not necessarily bad, it just doesn't match with the straight lines on the A&C style table. BTW, that is a very minor nit -- you did a really nice design and rendering job on the overall design.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

I think so too.

Why thank you, kind sir. I made a couple of adjustments and uploaded them for your perusal.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Lowangle-1.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Chairsq.jpg
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The straight chairs look more compatible with the table, the rounded chairs look more refined. You've got a conundrum there, good luck to ya.
I like the fact you can make those changes that quickly, what drawing and rendering packages are you using?
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Thanks. I can make the joints at the corners a bit bigger when using the curved sides. With the straight sides, I'm almost thinking of stretchers. I'll think of something.

It is a very intuitive design package called Strata 3D CX5. Runs on mac, like mine, or on a wintel box. I have been doing most models in CAD and then importing them into Strata for textures, lighting and rendering. But something as simple as these chairs, I do the modelling right inside Strata, a package which I have been using for 13 years (with various upgrades along the way) I recently opened a model which took almost 18 hours to render back in 1994. Took 22 minutes this time around and at a higher colour depth and tighter anti-aliasing. Computers have come a long way....and the one on order will cut that 22 minutes down to 5.
r
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... snip

Thanks, I've taken note of that for future reference. I'm currently using Turbo-CAD. Good 3D package, with pretty good rendering, but it does take quite a bit of time to draft out the components.
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Odd... I thought you had a Cray. <g>
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I do, but I only use it as intended; for my finances. <g>
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You know, what might work is if you make a curve in the bottom rail members of the table. that would allow you to keep the curves on the chair and tie the designs together.
Just like conversations, one always thinks of something after walking away.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:
[snipped for brevity]

I liked that idea, so I got my tools and went to work:
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/fixedit.jpg
Is that what you were thinking?

Yup.
Thanks.
r
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"Robatoy" wrote

I approve also. It is a subtle touch, but it goes together. It works.
What I wanna know robatoy, is how you build these tables and chairs SO FAST?!?! ;)
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Lee Michaels wrote:

Did you see the teeth on that saw? That sucker cuts real quick! (I was too lazy to add too much detail) In terms of modelling, it helps if you do it often. After a while, the metaphor between real construction and 'building' a model becomes quite natural, assuming your software allows that way of thinking, and most don't. I have 3D level AutoCAD certification from the local college and thoroughly despise the program/software. There is nothing 'natural' about it. I don't use it. I use MiniCAD (now called Vectorworks) and Strata 3D. For proper, to scale, dimensioned drawings, I use Vectorworks. All on a Mac, but all that stuff runs on Billyware as well. Yet, a neighbour of mine has been using AutoCAD since screens were green, and finds it the most intuitive software there is. a) he uses it every day. b) he stays in shape. c) poor guy doesn't know any better. <NOMEX suit =ON>
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"Robatoy" wrote in message

I got jealous after looking after your "stuff" yesterday and, since it too damn cold to go in the shop, I decided to try my hand at "Sketchup" ... pretty cool concept, but the free one is certainly is not the one to design furniture with AFAICT.
I do have a copy of DesignCAD 3D ... might reload it and see if it's any better while it's too cold for this thin blooded coonass to work in the shop. (.... and all you Canuckians can quit laughing about 32 F being "too cold".)
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Last update: 1/06/07
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Swingman wrote: [snip]

Sketchup is kinda cool, sorta not. Very limited to a basic ...errmm..sketch?

I have seen some decent stuff done in both Turbo- and DesignCAD. But, like any tool, make it work for you. Three tools to look for: (sometimes called by different names) are Add, Clip, and Multiple Extrude. 'Add' allows you to take two objects, join (or overlap) them to become one new object: two rectangles become an l-shape. 'Clip' (sometimes called subtract) does the opposite: Take a rectangle and overlap with another object and the result will be a rabbet, or when using an overlapping circle, a core-box bit look-a-like. Third, and very useful: Multiple Extrude. Take a square 3"x3" and a square 1"x1" put them parallel to each other and 30" apart. Multiple Extrude will create a tapered object, like a table leg. Those are the three tools I used for the table and chair frames. The seat cushion is a bit more complex.
How to carve a virtual bust of Mozart: Take a big virtual block of wood. With the Clip tool, remove everything that doesn't look like Mozart. (Yup, there is such a thing as CAD humour.... such as it is.)
r
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It works for me, though if you have a lot of curves you've got problems. I find it especially useful just for playing with dimensions to see how it's going to look and I can fill in the details myself. For example:
For a chest for a client I started out with these two sketches to show possibilities:
http://krtwood.com/chest1.jpg
http://krtwood.com/chest2.jpg
And after deciding on the frame and panel that got refined to this:
http://krtwood.com/chest3.jpg
And the result:
http://krtwood.com/chest7.jpg
-Leuf
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"Leuf" wrote in message

too
design
How'd you do that??
Did you do this with the free version?
:)

Absolutely gorgeous, on both counts!!
You're miles ahead of me, but then I just downloaded it yesterday and went through the four downloadable "tutorials" ... maybe I better have another look, eh?
Thanks for the inspiration!
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Yes. Basically, draw a rectangle that's the footprint of the piece. Pull it up to the height. Draw your rails and styles on the faces. Push the panels in. Easy. The edge profile on the top is the tricky part, but I don't usually even bother with details like that.
One thing that definitely helps is to change the format of the units from architectural to fractional, so that all your dimensions are in inches rather than feet and inches. It's buried in a menu, Window->Model Info. >> And the result:

Thanks! Client has a whole maple/cherry bedroom set that I was matching. Working on a small dresser for her now too, so I guess she liked it.

There's a lot where it seems like I'm banging my head against the wall trying to get an arc or something. But sticking with mainly rectangular shapes it works real well, real fast. Well suited for mission type stuff I think.
-Leuf
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Leuf wrote:

Arcs aren't a problem in Strata. Here are some examples of Strata's capabilities. This guy (Leif Buckley) is good.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/SG.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/razor.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/taps.jpg
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Leuf wrote:

Fabulous!
The knowledge how a piece gets made and how it goes together in RT really helps the model construction.
For a look and feel about the proportions of a project, a high-end rendering engine isn't really required.
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