Dangers of wood stove in shop without dust collection

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I recently read about storing finishes in a cabinet with a 60W bulb and a thermostat to keep them at a stable temperature. This would seem to be a much more economical solution than using an electric heater to keep the whole finishing area warm.
-Rick
js wrote:

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Glad I could help.
Back when I lived in Montana my shop was heated with a wood stove but had no separate room. I just made up a box large enough to carry the glue and finishes and kept it in the heated bunk house till the shop reached a reasonable temperature.
A pain but it worked. Of course when the last of the kids moved out the bunk house became the shop. Much nicer.
Good luck.
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Mike G.
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js wrote:

No more than any other kind of direct heat. Gas, oil, or electric all provide ignition sources. If you want to be completely safe from the risk of having your heating system ignite the dust then you have to go with steam or hot water or a heat pump without backup (regular electric heat uses a red-hot filament, heat pumps don't get much if any any hotter than the backside of an air conditioner).
Do keep the dust swept up, especially in the immediate vicinity of the stove.
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--John
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On Mon, 03 May 2004 12:07:17 GMT, "js"
Depends what sort of work you do. Neander-only is fine, a sawbench wouldn't worry me, but if I was regularly routing MDF without dust control I just wouldn't do it.
You may also find that local safety rules simply forbid woodstoves in workshops.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy Dingley wrote:

MDF dust generated from common woodshop practices (sawing, sanding, etc.) is far to granular and far too sparse in density to pose a fire/explosion risk. Though... it is nasty stuff. Messy!!!!!
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I wouldn't worry too much about it. Remember wood stove's where the only source of heat for many hundreds of years and people still did wood working in heated shops. Obvious precautions should be taken like not storing wood too close to the stove ect. Puff

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heat,
I'd not worry about the dust collection as much as solvents and the fumes from them.
One big caution. Wood stoves may be cool because it has not been burned for a day, but the can still be a hot coal or two under the ashes. You may think you are safe and start using a solvent based finish and BOOM ! ! ! If you are using a kerosene or propane heater you know the flame is out. Wood or coal, not so.
FWIW, solid fueled heaters are not allowed (National Fire Code) in garages attached to a house. You may have other local code issues. Ed
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js wrote:

It depends on the ratio of hand tools to power tools you use and how messy you are. My grandfather had a wood stove in his woodshop for 50+ years and never had a fire. He was very neat and was afraid of power tools too. :)
Tim
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no. I used to have a propane heater right next to the bandsaw with no DC. all that happened was the sawdust that landed on it smoked. it takes a very dense dust cloud to burn.
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Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
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Research I've read indicates that the particulate density required for a flame to propagate in a dust cloud is such that visibility would only be about a meter. So, the rule of thumb I use is - If I can still see the far wall of the shop, the dust cloud won't ignite. That doesn't say anything about solvent fumes, nor will I.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Tom Veatch notes:

Yeah. Solvent fumes, except for water, tend to create a really nasty "foomp" sound.
I recall seeing a buddy get ready to toss a few ounces of gasoline in a wood stove. It worked, and he claimed he did it often, but I was outdoors waiting before his arm got all the way to the release point.
Other solvents are even more volatile than gas. I'd find some other way to warm the shop before finishing, I think. Propane and kerosene burners work well, and can be shut down a few minutes before finishing work is started.
Charlie Self "Don't let yesterday use up too much of today." Will Rogers
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On Mon, 03 May 2004 12:07:17 GMT, "js"

Only if your dust collector isn't grounded. Oops! Wrong thread! <G>
I would do it, but I wouldn't use solvent based finishes or glues while it was lit. I'd also be picky about where the stove was located compared to major dust generators, like router tables, power saws, and sanders. Care should be taken to keep the area around the stove, and the stove itself, clean. I have an oil-fired furnace in my shop right now, complete with internal open flame.
Just 'cuz I would do it, dosen't mean you should. It's not my fault if you blow up.
Barry
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Yeah, he should use a thin kerf blade to make less dust. Not to mention the savings in wood cost. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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the
Better still: the negative kerf blade, and that does double-duty as a a dust collector.
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OOOooo, I like those, but have a hard time finding a good supplier. Any suggestions? I'm willing to trade a truck load of postholes for the right situation.
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Dave Hinz notes:

Sorry. My S10 won't handle the weight.
Charlie Self "The lust of avarice as so totally seized upon mankind that their wealth seems rather to possess them than they possess their wealth." Pliny
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How far away are you from me? I can deliver them in the loader, and install them with the backhoe if you're close enough. They're a bit crooked, but for most purposes they're fine.
Dave
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Dave Hinz responds:

Ah, well, maybe I'm close enough. If so, I'll move away.
Charlie Self "The lust of avarice as so totally seized upon mankind that their wealth seems rather to possess them than they possess their wealth." Pliny
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do they include installation?
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Nope, they're self-installing, but you've got to align them to north (of course) before setting 'em.
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