Cyclone dust collector question

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mark wrote:

Sorry, I misunderstood - I've never used one of the funnel-shaped cyclone units...
It should work provided the trash can is the right size. I think you're going to be pleased.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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and whatever it's sucking dust from...
it's just a garbage can with 2 hose connections, at least on of which should have a 90 degree elbow inside the can to make it swirl..
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wrote:

Right, I understand that -- let me rephrase -- if I go buy a commercially made sheetmetal cyclone, I can install it using the same "garbage can" method?
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Yes. The top mount for the blower wheel and motor is a convenience, not a necessity. The filtering/separation action of the cyclone is due to the dynamics of the air moving through the cyclone and is not dependent on the location of the blower.
From a practical standpoint, you may have some difficulty closing off and sealing the top of the cyclone cylinder and adapting a transition fitting from the cyclone outlet to the inlet of your blower. But that depends on the design and construction of the specific cyclone.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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On 16 Nov 2004 04:49:40 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (mnterpfan) vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Rant on. HTH.
One thing to remember. A good cyclone will stop a heck of a lot. In fact I saw where the 'standard" bags on a DC are a waste of time if you have a good cyclone!
.......but.....and a big but...there are really fine bits (5 micron and below) that get through.........and the standard bags are "not needed" because they do not stop exactly these fine bits! It's being found that these fine bits are what really damages your lungs. So if you have a good cyclone (or not!), then you need proper filters on the outlet, not the bags that come with the DCs. Probably the ideal is cyclone, bags, then fine filter. Cyclone stops the bits, bag stops a bit more, last filter stops the real nasties. Each one is easier to "clean" than the next one. Final filter may not be cleanable at all.
There are filters called HEPA. High Efficiency Particulate Arrestance. Some filters are _called_ HEPA. Others _are_ HEPA, AFAICS. These are medical grade. "Boy in a bubble" stuff.
However, I have been advised that you do not really need HEPA filters for shop use. They are often expensive, small in area (less time before they need replacing as they clog), and often not reusable. There are industrial filters, that go down to .5 micron particle size, that are "concertinaed" to give huge area, and are a lot cheaper than HEPA per "cub ft of stopped dust", so to speak. Check with an industrial filter supply. That's where I went, and the guy was quite helpful. He could have sold me HEPA at twice the price, but was advising what he thought were better solutions for the real world.
Also remember that any filter system will need maintenance, and to be kept free-flowing. A lot of people say that bag filters increase in effectivness as they clog up, because the dust stuck in the weave acts as a better filter. But of course this results in reduced flow, so you lose a lot of the effect.
Rant off

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wrote:
Nick.. as a Ken Vaughn hero worshiper, I've adopted his dust collection system...
1) window fan blowing out of shop if possible...
2) DC connected to whatever is running, if possible..
3) Air filtration system using blower and large filters to clean small particles out of the air..

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Old Nick,
I'm not quite sure what theory I vaguely proposed. I was asking for advice on setup options. Specifically, I was interested in the statement in Torit's literature: "Can be used .... as a pre-cleaner."
I haven't seen any setups that include a powered cyclone feeding into another powered dust collector. One of my concerns is how the air and dust will behave between the two impellors. Does the second impellor mess up the cyclone action in the first one? Is there a danger to either motor?
For more information, my Jet is a 2hp/230v with a filter canister that filters to 2micron. It uses clear plastic collection bags. I don't think that this is what is referred to as standard filtration. The Torit cyclone is a 2hp/3ph with cabinet base. I believe it to be a very good industrial grade cyclone. Although I would like to keep both, it would use a lot of floor space, be very noisy to use both, use a lot of amperage (50 amp subpanel feeds whole shop), and not be financially attractive.
Thanks for your advice. It didn't seem like a rant to me. Again, I am advice seeking, not theory proposing.
Eric ps email address is non-functioning
(mnterpfan) vaguely

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On 22 Nov 2004 04:55:39 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (mnterpfan) vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

It's just a silly standard header for the message. Sorry.
Sometimes you will see "XXXX sat down and rattled off the following" or some such on other people's headers.
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No problem. I quite frequently do vaguely propose theories. Rarely are they right. I misunderstood the context.
Eric
Old Nick wrote:

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